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The Darkhotel APT

Secure List feed for B2B - Mon, 11/10/2014 - 04:00

 The Darkhotel APT – Kaspersky Lab Research
 Technical Appendix

Much like Crouching Yeti, the Darkhotel APT is an unusually murky, long standing and well-resourced threat actor exhibiting a strange combination of characteristics.

This APT precisely drives its campaigns by spear-phishing targets with highly advanced Flash zero-day exploits that effectively evade the latest Windows and Adobe defenses, and yet they also imprecisely spread among large numbers of vague targets with peer-to-peer spreading tactics. Moreover, this crew's most unusual characteristic is that for several years the Darkhotel APT has maintained a capability to use hotel networks to follow and hit selected targets as they travel around the world. These travelers are often top executives from a variety of industries doing business and outsourcing in the APAC region. Targets have included CEOs, senior vice presidents, sales and marketing directors and top R&D staff. This hotel network intrusion set provides the attackers with precise global scale access to high value targets. From our observations, the highest volume of offensive activity on hotel networks started in August 2010 and continued through 2013, and we are investigating some 2014 hotel network events.

In addition to polluting p2p networks to infect the masses, they delegitimize Certificate Authorities to further their attacks. They abuse weakly implemented digital certificates to sign their malcode. The actor abused the trust of at least ten CAs in this manner. Currently they are stealing and re-using other legitimate certificates to sign their mostly static backdoor and infostealer toolset. Their infrastructure grows and shrinks over time, with no consistent pattern to the setup. It is both protected with flexible data encryption and poorly defended with weak functionality.

Victim categories include the following verticals:

  • Very large electronics manufacturing
  • Investment capital and private equity
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Cosmetics and chemicals manufacturing offshoring and sales
  • Automotive manufacturer offshoring services
  • Automotive assembly, distribution, sales, and services
  • Defense industrial base
  • Law enforcement and military services
  • Non-governmental organizations

About 90 percent of the infections appear to be located in Japan, Taiwan, China, Russia and South Korea, partly because of the group's indiscriminate spread of malware. Overall, since 2008, the infection count numbers in the thousands. The more interesting travelling targets include top executives from the US and Asia doing business and investment in the APAC region. A combination of Kaspersky Security Network (KSN) detections and command and control data recorded infections in the United States, the United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Kazakhstan, South Korea, the Philippines, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Germany, Ireland, Mexico, Belgium, Serbia, Lebanon, Pakistan, Greece, Italy and others. This actor's victim geolocation distribution has a long tail, and multiple significant targets and victims travel frequently throughout many of these countries. So, victim geolocation changes while they are travelling frequently.

When Kaspersky Lab researchers visited Darkhotel incident destinations with honeypot machines they did not attract Darkhotel attacks, which suggests the APT acts selectively.. Further work demonstrated just how careful these attackers were to hide their activity - as soon as a target was effectively infected, they deleted their tools from the hotel network staging point, maintaining a hidden status.

Darkhotel activity and objects have leaked out in bits and pieces over the past few years, but we have identified Darkhotel tools dating back to 2007. Considering their well-resourced, advanced exploit development efforts and large, dynamic infrastructure, we expect more Darkhotel activity in the coming years. Our Darkhotel report and appendices of indicators and technical details collects and organizes this APT's activity to date.

Avoiding the Dark Security Future

Threatpost for B2B - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 17:47
LAS VEGAS–Nick Percoco has been thinking a lot about the future of technology, and some of the things he’s dreamed up aren’t very pretty: farms of people renting out their spare brain cycles, autonomous cars that freak out and careen into oncoming traffic and hacking groups hijacking users’ augmented reality gear and demanding ransoms to unlock […]

Expanding Use of PKI in Variety of Devices Holds Challenges

Threatpost for B2B - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 15:07
LAS VEGAS–One of the longest running jokes in the security industry is that each coming year finally will be The Year of PKI. While that one huge year never materialized, the use of PKI and digital certificates has become an integral part of how the Internet works today. But there are some challenges on the horizon […]

​Jeremy Rowley on the Facebook Tor Cert Decision and the Future of PKI

Threatpost for B2B - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 15:05
Dennis Fisher and DigiCert's Jeremy Rowley discuss the company's certificate issuance for Facebook's .onion site, the challenge of key protection in today's environment and what the near future holds for PKI.

Serious Root Access Bug in Belkin N750 Router

Threatpost for B2B - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 14:32
A serious vulnerability in a popular Belkin router could be exploited by a local, unauthenticated attacker to gain full control over affected devices.

Securing an Internet Made From ‘Duck Tape and Baling Wire’

Threatpost for B2B - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 13:35
LAS VEGAS–The Internet that we use today was not designed as a cohesive network. It was put together from found bits and pieces over the course of the last few decades, and, as major bugs such as Heartbleed and others have shown, it’s a frighteningly fragile construction. Attackers know this as well as anyone, and […]

Windows Version of WireLurker Out of Commission Too

Threatpost for B2B - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 12:50
A Windows version of the WireLurker malware has been discovered, and like the Mac OS X version, it too is believed to have been shut down.

Home Depot Breached Via Vendor Credentials; 53 Million Email Addresses Also Stolen

Threatpost for B2B - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 07:03
Home Depot revealed that hackers used credentials stolen from a third-party vendor to steal 53 million email addresses in addition to 56 million payment card numbers.

iOS Trojan WireLurker: Statistics and New Information

Secure List feed for B2B - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 04:59

Recently, news appeared about an interesting attack where cybercriminals infect iPhones and Mac OSX users with a rather peculiar malware dubbed WireLurker. You can find a thorough paper from Palo Alto here. First of all, it's important to note that all Kaspersky Lab users are protected against this threat. The malicious files used by WireLurker are identified by our products with the following detection names:

  • Mac OS X:
    • Trojan-Downloader.OSX.WireLurker.a
    • Trojan-Downloader.OSX.WireLurker.b
    • Trojan.OSX.WireLurker.a
  • Apple iOS:
    • Trojan-Spy.IphoneOS.WireLurker.a
    • Trojan-Spy.IphoneOS.WireLurker.b
  • Windows:
    • Trojan.Win32.Wirelurker.a

Our sensors observed connections to the malicious C&C server located in Hong Kong in July, 2014. These continued throughout the following months, although the volume remains low.

Interestingly, discussions on various online forums about this subject appeared earlier this year, notably in Chinese and Korean, but also on some English resources:

On July 14th, someone named SirBlanton complained about it on a Chinese speaking BBS:

Translation:

The discussion above happened on "bbs.maiyadi.com", which is interesting, because another subdomain on "maiyadi.com" is used by the malware as a C&C (see below).

Even earlier, on May 29th, a discussion in Korea mentioned abnormal behavior of a Mac OS X infected by this threat:

Interestingly, Mac OS X and Apple iOS are not the only platforms through which these attacks were propagated. Yesterday, our friend Jaime Blasco from Alienvault discovered a Win32 malicious tool that appears to be related.

The WireLurker Windows module

File name: 万能视频播放器 2.21.exe md5: fb4756b924c5943cdb73f5aec0cb7b14

Win32 WireLurker module

The file appears to have been compiled in March 2014, assuming the timestamp is not altered:

Full metadata set:

Machine Type                    : Intel 386 or later, and compatibles Time Stamp                      : 2014:03:13 03:56:21-04:00 PE Type                         : PE32 Linker Version                  : 10.0 Code Size                       : 721920 Initialized Data Size           : 1364480 Uninitialized Data Size         : 0 Entry Point                     : 0xafb86 OS Version                      : 5.1 Image Version                   : 0.0 Subsystem Version               : 5.1 Subsystem                       : Windows GUI File Version Number             : 1.0.0.1 Product Version Number          : 1.0.0.1 File Flags Mask                 : 0x003f File Flags                      : (none) File OS                         : Windows NT 32-bit Object File Type                : Executable application File Subtype                    : 0 Language Code                   : Chinese (Simplified) Character Set                   : Unicode File Description                : 绿色IPA安装器 File Version                    : 1.0.0.1 Internal Name                   : 绿色IPA安装器.exe Original Filename               : 绿色IPA安装器.exe Product Name                    : 绿色IPA安装器 Product Version                 : 1.0.0.1

The internal file name is "绿色IPA安装器" which, when translated to English, means Green IPA installer. It supposed to be an application to install IPA files on iOS devices.

Interestingly, it contains a debug path which reveals information about the build:

 E:\lifei\libimobiledevice-win32-master_last\Release\appinstaller.pdb

The application contains two IPA (Apple application archives) inside, one called "AVPlayer" and one called "apps".
AVPlayer.app appears to be a legimitated iOS application that is used by the attackers as a decoy.

The image (icon) of the app can be seen below:

The "legit" application appears to have been authored by a popular developer going by the handle "teiron@25pp.com".

The second IPA is more interesting. It appears to have been created in March 2014. "apps" communicates with the wellknown "comeinbaby[.]com": The sfbase.dylib part communicates with a different C&C: To summarize, the Win32 application described here allows the installation of the mentioned iOS payload to the victim's iPhone. The creator likely developed it just to make sure Windows users can also get infected on their iOS devices.

KSN Detections

Kaspersky Security Network (KSN) is a complex distributed infrastructure dedicated to processing cybersecurity-related data streams from millions of voluntary participants around the world. It delivers Kaspersky Lab's security intelligence to every partner or customer who is connected to the Internet, ensuring the quickest reaction times, lowest false positive rate and maintaining the highest level of protection. A detailed description of KSN can be found here. The following chart below shows detections of WireLurker on OSX:

Over 60% of the detections are coming from China, which is to be expected.

Conclusions

This incident is yet another reminder of why the use of pirated software remains dangerous, no matter which platform you're using. Downloading applications from unofficial sources, such as alternative marketplaces, file sharing websites or torrents and other P2P file sharing networks, increases the risk of malware infections. On Mac OS X for instance, it is one of the main infection vectors.

The need for anti-malware protection on Mac OS X devices cannot be overstated. It's not only that your Mac OS X machine can get infected, but WireLurker showed us how the infection can move from your Mac to your iPhone. The good news is: there are plenty of options to chose from out there, including our own Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac.

As a first line of defense, Mac OS X users should check their Security & Privacy settings to make sure the configuration of their system is optimal. We recommend setting up Gatekeeper so that only applications downloaded from the Mac App Store and identified developers are allowed to be installed. More information on Gatekeeper can be found here.

Make sure to also check out our own guide for Mac security: 10 Simple Tips for Boosting The Security Of Your Mac

This should also be a wake-up call for Apple users and the way they think about security. Just like Mac OS X malware quickly evolved from being just a myth to becoming a sad reality, we are seeing iOS being targeted more and more often lately - with nobody being able to offer protection for this platform. Anti-malware vendors are still not allowed to develop protection for iPhone users.

In the light of recent events, will this strategy change in the future?

Indicators of compromise:

C&Cs:
app.maiyadi[.]com
comeinbaby[.]com
61.147.80.73
124.248.245.78

MD5s:
3fa4e5fec53dfc9fc88ced651aa858c6
5b43df4fac4cac52412126a6c604853c
88025c70d8d9cd14c00a66d3f3e07a84
9037cf29ed485dae11e22955724a00e7
a3ce6c8166eec5ae8ea059a7d49b5669
aa6fe189baa355a65e6aafac1e765f41
bc3aa0142fb15ea65de7833d65a70e36
c4264b9607a68de8b9bbbe30436f5f28
c6d95a37ba39c0fa6688d12b4260ee7d
c9841e34da270d94b35ae3f724160d5e
dca13b4ff64bcd6876c13bbb4a22f450
e03402006332a6e17c36e569178d2097
fb4756b924c5943cdb73f5aec0cb7b14

Security Holes in Corporate Networks: Network Vulnerabilities

Secure List feed for B2B - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 03:52

In our previous blogpost, we told you about the types of attacks that a cybercriminal can undertake while working with a regular user account without local administrator privileges. In particular, we presented an example of how the simplified inheritance of privileges within the context of domain authorization (Single-Sign-On) enables cybercriminals to gain access to various network resources and services while using the limited access allowed by a regular user account. In this blogpost, we will review in detail the possible vectors for an attack launched on a corporate network from an infected computer within it.

Once a cybercriminal has gained control over a user system in a corporate network, subsequent events form three consecutive stages: establishing a foothold in the system, analyzing the environment, and propagating malware. Each of these stages can be implemented in various ways, distinguished by the technical methods, strategies and tactics employed. The flow chart below shows the cybercriminal's possible approaches to establishing a foothold in the system, analyzing the environment, and propagating malware across the corporate network.

A flow chart of a cybercriminal's actions

It is important for information security specialists to recognize the distinctive signs of different types of attack. Using this proposed "action plan", information security specialists can detect an attack by matching events occurring in the network to various templates of cybercriminal activity.

Gaining a Foothold in the System

After penetrating a corporate network, attackers typically download utilities (including malware) to the victim computer within a few hours or minutes. These utilities are required to collect information about the system and its installed software, search for files and data, establish a connection to the C&C, steal login credentials, brute-force passwords, hack accounts, escalate privileges, infect a system, intercept network traffic, scan network devices etc.

To hide these essential tools from network administrators during the download process and avoid triggering any security system that might be in place, attackers use different maneuvers of varying degrees of complexity:

  • Files are transferred via network protocols and general-purpose ports (HTTP, FTP, HTTPS, SFTP) so they get lost in the huge amounts of daily user-generated traffic.
  • Files are downloaded from compromised servers, using Fast Flux networks or via Tor.
  • Files are transmitted in parts, in obfuscated and/or encrypted form.
  • Various types of steganography are sometimes used to transfer data, such as masking data within audio/video files, images or headers of internet protocols, especially when general-purpose ports are closed by a firewall.

When the required tools have been loaded, the cybercriminal attempts to gain access to the local administrator's or system account. The first attempt normally uses keyloggers, attempts to brute-force passwords and hack accounts, or phishing scams. Further approaches involve exploiting vulnerabilities in system services, typically to gain access to the system account (i.e. to escalate to kernel-level privileges).

Having obtained these privileges, cybercriminals can entrench themselves in the system by implanting a rootkit or bootkit in the operating system. They can also clean the system from traces of penetration, hiding their tools and traces of active infections from security tools. If the attackers failed to gain a foothold in the system in the regular way, they can set up an automatic infection of the system, e.g. by using the regular task scheduler.

Naturally, there are many ways of establishing a foothold, and scenarios may differ dramatically from the above description. However, as we said at the beginning of this article, it is important that an information security specialist understands the principles of how an attack is conducted, and realizes the tasks that cybercriminals face. Thus, at the foothold stage, the attacker's main task to arrange for reliable, lasting access to the system under attack. In general, the task of arranging remote access has two parts: establishing a data communication channel and implanting a remote control tool (backdoor).

Depending on the network configuration, firewall policies and IDS/IPS settings, attackers might use direct or reverse connection. Direct connection involves the attackers establishing a connection to the victim system, and is possible only if the system has an external IP-address and open network ports that are not blocked from outside connections by a firewall. Otherwise, reverse connection is used, when the attacked system establishes a connection to the remote server. Regardless of the connection type, data is communicated using the same methods that are used to download utilities and malware to the victim computer: data is transferred in encrypted / obfuscated format via general-purpose protocols / ports, using Fast Flux or Tor. In addition, cybercriminals can also use regular user software and services as a data communication channel, such as cloud-based file storages, e-mail, IM clients etc.

Environment analysis

At the same time as establishing a foothold – or sometimes even before – cybercriminals need to collect information about the operating system and its configuration, updates installed for software, and security tools. That information is needed to evaluate the situation on the victim computer and plan further attack activities. It is also very useful when accurately selecting the most effective utilities and exploits.

The following readily available tools are usually sufficient to collect information about the system:

  • cmd, regedit, vbs, powershell in Windows,
  • bash, grep, python, perl in Unix/Linux and Mac OS.

From the attacker's viewpoint, there are many advantages to using the above tools: they are available in any system, they are useable even with restricted user rights, and their operation is not controlled by most security tools. To tackle more complicated tasks cybercriminals use both popular and customized tools to intercept network traffic, scan network devices, connect to various network services using domain authentication etc. If the hacker's tools are written, say, in Python, the cybercriminals will certainly install the required software on the infected computer. In this case, Python (or other required software) probably will not be concealed in the system using a rootkit, as that may prevent the interpreter from working properly.

To search for and analyze other devices in the corporate network, cybercriminals apply passive and active scanning methods. In particular, using a sniffer to listen to traffic from a local network interface, anyone can easily detect various devices thanks to ARP packets or active connections, determine the URLS of servers hosting corporate applications such as Active Directory, Outlook, databases, corporate websites etc. To obtain detailed information about a specific network node, cybercriminals use network scanners (e.g. nmap) to determine available network services, guess names and versions of installed software, and detect the presence of a firewall and IDS/IPS.

Distribution

Now the attackers have a foothold in the system, have a reliable remote access channel and have sufficient information about the network. The next actions usually pursue the primary objective. That may be stealing confidential information, attacks on corporate infrastructure, gaining control over critical systems for blackmail purposes, or other personal purposes. Unless the initially attacked system is the ultimate target (that can be e.g. a CEO's laptop, a central server or a website), the attacker needs to gain control over other systems within the corporate network. Depending on the nature of the target, infection may be pinpointed or broad scale.

For example, if the attackers plan to launch an infrastructure attack, they will probably need massive infections of the servers running various business processes and the workstations of operators and administrators. On the other hand, a cybercriminal aiming to steal confidential information or conduct espionage will have to act very carefully and attack only the top priority systems.

There are a number of ways of propagating malware within a corporate network. Cybercriminals normally go for the simplest approach, such as using existing accounts. For example, by launching malicious code from under a domain account belonging to a user of an infected system, the cybercriminal can freely connect to various network services (to which the user has access) using domain authorization (Single Sign-On), i.e. without entering the login credentials. On the other hand, the cybercriminal can use a keylogger and easily get hold of the login credentials to the domain account as well as other services that do not maintain domain authorization. I addition, the cybercriminal may attempt to take advantage of vulnerabilities in the mechanisms for storing and checking credentials, or simply brute-force the password.

The most effective propagation path within corporate networks is to exploit vulnerabilities, since most corporate network security focuses on preventing attacks from outside the perimeter. Consequently, there are a multitude of varied vulnerabilities within the network, including unsecured corporate servers, test servers, management/virtualization systems etc. Practice shows that even if information security specialists and IT engineers are aware of all the vulnerabilities existing in their corporate network(s), it takes them years to fix them because it requires a lot of manpower. Nevertheless, experienced hackers are cautious about using exploits to known vulnerabilities and prefer to attack unsecured corporate services. If a local or network-based IDS/IPS is still used in the network, using exploits to known vulnerabilities may unmask the cybercriminals.

Detecting an Attack

At each stage of the attack, cybercriminals often use the environment and the available tools for their own purposes, remaining inconspicuous against the backdrop of regular users' activities. To address this problem, it is important wherever possible to reduce redundancy in the environment and the business processes; in all other cases, it is vital to monitor what's happening, identify anomalies and react to them.

A vivid example of the problem of redundancy in business processes is the free access to business assets (confidential documents, critical applications, hardware etc.), local administrator privileges, and the capability of remote connection to the corporate network for staff who do not need this level of access and privilege. This applies to the control of access rights at the domain level as well as at the level of application software: browsers do not typically need access to other processes' memory, while Microsoft Office does not need to install drivers.

For an example of environment redundancy, we can think of a regular corporate employee (not a developer, tester, administrator or information security specialist) whose desktop has software designed for network traffic interception, scanning the network, remote access, creation of local HTTP/FTP servers, use of third-party network hardware (Wi-Fi and/or 3G modems), software development tools etc.

Any effective strategy to prevent attacks from within the corporate network must prevent cybercriminals from acting secretly, and force them to take complicated and risky steps that betray their plans to information security specialists who can neutralize the threat. For that, two things must be present in the corporate network: smart security and an information security management system.

If you marry these two technologies you create a fundamentally different animal from the established information security model. It can see everything that takes place in the system and immediately reacts to threats.

Smart security tools include some antiviruses, firewalls, IDS/IPS/HIPS, Application Control, Device Control - however they must be capable of interacting with the information security management system. These security tools should not only collect all types of information and send it to the information security management system, but also execute commands that block attempts to gain access, establish connections, transfer data via the network, launch applications, read and write files etc. Naturally, for all of this to work, an information security specialist must be able to differentiate between legitimate and malicious activity.

DigiCert Considering Certs for Hidden Services Beyond Facebook

Threatpost for B2B - Thu, 11/06/2014 - 15:05
DigiCert explains why it issued a signed certificate to Facebook's .Onion Tor domain, noting it may offer more hidden services certs in the future.

Microsoft Ready with 16 Patch Tuesday Bulletins; 5 Critical

Threatpost for B2B - Thu, 11/06/2014 - 14:34
Microsoft is expected to release 16 bulletins next week, including five rated critical, as part of its November 2014 Patch Tuesday updates.

WireLurker Mac OS X Malware Shut Down

Threatpost for B2B - Thu, 11/06/2014 - 12:13
Researchers at Palo Alto Networks discovered a new family of Mac OS X malware that was capable of also infecting iOS devices. The command infrastructure supporting WireLurker has been shut down.
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