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Brazilian Payment Fraud Campaign Targets Boletos, Steals Millions

Threatpost for B2B - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 10:04
A fraud ring targeting Brazil's Boleto payment method has pulled off hundreds of thousands of bogus transactions valued at $3.75 billion.

Cisco Patches Hardcoded SSH Key Vulnerability in UCM

Threatpost for B2B - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 09:52
The Cisco Unified Communications Domain Manager contains a default private SSH key that could allow an attacker to run arbitrary code on vulnerable installations. The bug is about as serious as they come, giving remote, unauthenticated attackers access to affected machines with the rights of a root user.

Miniduke is back: Nemesis Gemina and the Botgen Studio

Secure List feed for B2B - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 04:46
A 2014 update on one of the world's most unusual APT operations

In 2013, together with our partner CrySyS Lab, we announced our research on a new APT actor we dubbed "Miniduke". It stood out from the "APT bunch" for several reasons, including:

  • Its use of a customized backdoor written in Assembler (who still writes in Assembler in the age of Java and .NET?)
  • A unique command and control mechanism that uses multiple redundancy paths, including Twitter accounts
  • Stealthy transfer of updates as executables hidden inside GIF files (a form of steganography)

We have pointed out that this threat actor used malware developed using "old-school" virus writing techniques and habits.

Our analysis was continued later by researchers from CIRCL/Luxembourg and several other AV companies. Recently, we became aware of an F-Secure publication on the same topic (under the name "CosmicDuke").

In the wake of our publications from 2013, the Miniduke campaigns have stopped or at least decreased in intensity. However, in the beginning of 2014 they resumed attacks in full force, once again grabbing our attention.

We believe it's time to uncover more information on their operations.

"Old" Miniduke in 2014

The old style Miniduke implants from 2013 are still around and being used during the current campaigns.

It still relies on Twitter accounts which contain a hardcoded C&C URL pointing to the command and control server. One such account was the following, observed in February 2014:

Although the format of the C&C URL was changed from previous variants, the encoding algorithm is the same. The line above can be decoded into the full C&C URL:

hxxp://algherolido.it/img/common/thumb/thumb.php

This decoded URL was an active C&C, from which several updates have been collected:

Update 1:

MD5 93382e0b2db1a1283dbed5d9866c7bf2 Size 705536 bytes Compilation Sat Dec 14 18:44:11 2013

This Trojan is a large package, due to the use of a custom packer. The bundle has a specific debug string inside:

C:\Projects\nemesis-gemina\nemesis\bin\carriers\ezlzma_x86_exe.pdb

The package executes a smaller Trojan module:

MD5 b80232f25dbceb6953994e45fb7ff749 Size 27648 bytes Compilation timestamp Wed Mar 05 09:44:36 2014 C&C hxxp://rtproductionsusa.com/wp-includes/images/smilies/icon_gif.php

Another update that has been observed on the C&C server was:

Update 2:

MD5 7fcf05f7773dc3714ebad1a9b28ea8b9 Size 28160 bytes Compilation timestamp Fri Mar 07 10:04:58 2014 C&C hxxp://tangentialreality.com/cache/template/yoo_cache.php

We have observed another similar Trojan, although not on the C&Cs directly:

MD5 edf7a81dab0bf0520bfb8204a010b730,
ba57f95eba99722ebdeae433fc168d72 (dropped) Size 700K, 28160 (dropped) Compilation timestamps Sat Dec 14 18:44:11 2013 (top)
Fri Jan 10 12:59:36 2014 (dropped) C&C hxxp://store.extremesportsevents.net/index.php?i=62B...[snip]

The use of the Nemesis Gemina packer in the Miniduke payloads made us look for further samples in our collection. This led us to several new findings.

The "New" Miniduke Malware (the "CosmicDuke")

After the 2013 exposure, the actor behind Miniduke appears to have switched to using another custom backdoor, capable of stealing various types of information.

The malware spoofs popular applications designed to run in the background, including file information, icons and even file size:

The main "new" Miniduke backdoor (aka TinyBaron or CosmicDuke) is compiled using a customizable framework called "BotGenStudio", which has flexibility to enable/disable components when the bot is constructed.

The components can be divided into 3 groups

  1. Persistence
  2. Reconnaissance
  3. Exfiltration
Persistence

Miniduke/CosmicDuke is capable of starting via Windows Task Scheduler, via a customized service binary that spawns a new process set in the special registry key, or is launched when the user is away and the screensaver is activated.

Reconnaissance

The malware can steal a variety of information, including files based on extensions and file name keywords:

*.exe;*.ndb;*.mp3;*.avi;*.rar;*.docx;*.url;*.xlsx;*.pptx;*.ppsx;*.pst;*.ost;*psw*;*pass*;
*login*;*admin*;*sifr*;*sifer*;*vpn;*.jpg;*.txt;*.lnk; *.dll;*.tmp;*.obj;*.ocx;*.js

Note: we believe the "*sifr*" and "*sifer*" keywords above refer to the transliteration of the English word "Cypher" in some languages.

Also, the backdoor has many other capabilities including:

  • Keylogger
  • Skype password stealer
  • General network information harvester
  • Screen grabber (grabs images every 5 minutes)
  • Clipboard grabber (grabs clipboard contents every 30 seconds)
  • Microsoft Outlook, Windows Address Book stealer
  • Google Chrome password stealer
  • Google Talk password stealer
  • Opera password stealer
  • TheBat! password stealer
  • Firefox, Thunderbird password stealer
  • Drives/location/locale/installed software harvester
  • WiFi network/adapter information harvester
  • LSA secrets harvester
  • Protected Storage secrets harvester
  • Certificate/private keys exporter
  • URL History harvester
  • InteliForms secrets harvester
  • IE Autocomplete, Outlook Express secrets harvester
  • and more...
Exfiltration

The malware implements several methods to exfiltrate information, including uploading data via FTP and three variants of HTTP-based communication mechanisms. A number of different HTTP connectors act as helpers, trying various methods in case one of them is restricted by local security policies or security software. These three methods are:

  • Direct TCP connection and HTTP session via Winsock library
  • HTTP session via Urlmon.dll
  • HTTP session via invisible instance of Internet Explorer as OLE object
Implementation Specifics

Each victim is assigned a unique ID, making it possible to push specific updates to an individual victim. As we noted, Miniduke/CosmicDuke is protected with a custom obfuscated loader which heavily consumes CPU resources for 3-5 minutes before passing execution to the payload. This not only complicates analysis of the malware but is also used to drain resources reserved for execution in emulators integrated in security software. Besides its own obfuscator, it makes heavy use of encryption and compression based on the RC4 and LZRW algorithms respectively. Implementations of these algorithms have tiny differences from the standardized code which perhaps looks like a mistake in the code. Nevertheless, we believe that these changes were introduced on purpose to mislead researchers.

One of the more technically advanced parts of Miniduke is the data storage. The internal configuration of the malware is encrypted, compressed and serialized as a complicated registry-like structure which has various record types including strings, integers and internal references.

In addition, Miniduke uses an unusual method to store the exfiltrated data. When a file is uploaded to the C&C server it is split into small chunks (~3KB), which are compressed, encrypted and placed in a container to be uploaded to the server. If the source file is large enough it may be placed into several hundred different containers that are uploaded independently. These data chunks are probably parsed, decrypted, unpacked, extracted and reassembled on the attacker' side. This method is used to upload screenshots made on the victim's machine. Creating such a complicated storage might be an overhead; however, all those layers of additional processing guarantees that very few researchers will get to the original data while offering an increased reliability against network errors.

Victim geography and profiles

Based on our analysis, the victims of Miniduke and CosmicDuke fall into these categories:

  • government
  • diplomatic
  • energy
  • telecom operators
  • military, including military contractors
  • individuals involved in the traffic and selling of illegal and controlled substances

From one of the old style Miniduke servers we were able to extract a list of victims and their corresponding countries. We were able to identify victims in three of these countries which belonged to the "government" category. Here's the list of countries affected:

  • Australia
  • Belgium
  • France
  • Germany
  • Hungary
  • Netherlands
  • Spain
  • Ukraine
  • United States

One of the CosmicDuke servers we analyzed had a long list of victims dating back to April 2012. This server had 265 unique identifiers assigned to victims from 139 unique IPs. Geographical distribution of the victims was as follows (top10):

84 Georgia 61 Russia 34 United States 14 United Kingdom 9 Kazakhstan 8 India 8 Belarus 6 Cyprus 4 Ukraine 4 Lithuania


According to our analysis, the attackers were more interested in expanding their operations and scanned IP ranges and servers in Azerbaijan, Greece and Ukraine.

Command and control server analysis and hacking tools

During the analysis, we were able to obtain a copy of one of the CosmicDuke command and control servers. It appears it was also used for other operations by the group members, including hacking into other servers on the internet.

The attackers have deployed a number of publicly available hacking tools on this server in order to scan and compromise websites of victim organizations as well as collect information for future targeted attacks.

Here is the list of hacking tools found on the server:

Hydra: "A very fast network logon cracker which support many different services"

Fierce2: "A semi-lightweight enumeration scanner that helps penetration testers locate non-contiguous IP space and hostnames for a specified domains using things like DNS, Whois and ARIN"

The Harvester: "The objective of this program is to gather emails, subdomains, hosts, employee names, open ports and banners from different public sources like search engines, PGP key servers and SHODAN computer database"

RitX: "A Reverse IP Lookup Tool that will allows you to use an IP address or domain name to identify all currently domains hosted on a server using multiple services and various techniques"

Joomscan: "OWASP Joomla! Vulnerability Scanner"

Ncrack: "High-speed network authentication cracking tool. It allows for rapid, yet reliable large-scale auditing of multiple hosts"

Sqlmap: "An open source penetration testing tool that automates the process of detecting and exploiting SQL injection flaws and taking over of database servers"

WPScan: "A black box WordPress vulnerability scanner"

Note: tool descriptions were copied from their public websites

Attribution and Artifacts, connections with other campaigns

Although the attackers use English in several places, indicating knowledge of this language, there are certain indicators to suggest they are not native English speakers.

The following strings were discovered in a block of memory appended to the malware component used for persistence:

www.mirea.ru
e.mail.ru
gmt4
c:\documents and settings\владимир\local settings\...

The C&C hosts appear to have been compromised by the attackers, which uploaded a specific webshell.




The Miniduke attackers' webshell on hacked hosts

For the webshell, it is interesting to point to the use of Codepage 1251, which is commonly used to render Cyrillic characters. The password used to protect the shell, is checked against the MD5 hash "35c7c2d1fe03f0eeaa4630332c242a36". (BTW: can you crack it? It took us some days to solve it!)

Perhaps it is noteworthy to say that the same webshell has been observed in the operations of another advanced threat actor known as Turla, Snake or Uroburos.

Another interesting aspect is the debug path strings from the malware, which indicate several build environments or groups of "users" of the "Bot Gen Studio", "NITRO" and "Nemesis Gemina":

c:\botgenstudio\generations\fdd88801\bin\Bot.pdb
c:\botgenstudio\generations\fed14e50\bin\Bot.pdb
D:\SVA\NITRO\BotGenStudio\Interface\Generations\80051A85\bin\bot.pdb
d:\sva\nitro\botgenstudio\interface\generations\805f8183\bin\Bot.pdb
d:\production\nitro\sva\generations\80deae99\bin\Bot.pdb
C:\Projects\nemesis-gemina\nemesis\bin\carriers\ezlzma_x86_exe.pdb
C:\Projects\NEMESIS\nemesis-gemina\nemesis\bin\carriers\ezlzma-boost-kitchen_sink_x86_exe.pdb
D:\PRODUCTION\NITRO\SVA\Generations\80911F82\bin\bot.pdb

Based on the compilation timestamps, we were able to put together the following chart indicating the activity of the Miniduke/CosmicDuke attackers on a 'Day of the Week' basis:

It appears the attackers follow the Mon-Fri work week, however, they do work on the weekends from time to time.

In terms of activity hours, the attackers appear to be working between 6am and 7pm GMT. Most of the work is done between 6am and 4pm though.



Conclusions

Although they stopped or at least decreased in intensity following our announcement last year, the Miniduke attacks are now back in force. The old style Miniduke malware is still being used, deploying previously known stages packed with a new obfuscator observed with the mysterious "Bot Gen Studio" for the "NITRO" and "Nemesis Gemina" projects.

While the old style Miniduke implants were used to target mostly government victims, the new style CosmicDuke implants have a somehow different typology of victims. The most unusual is the targeting of individuals that appear to be involved in the traffic and reselling of controlled and illegal substances, such as steroids and hormones. These victims in the NITRO project have been observed only in Russia. One possibility is that "Bot Gen Studio" is a malware platform also available as a so-called "legal spyware" tool, similar to others, such as HackingTeam's RCS, widely used by law enforcement agencies. Another possibility is that it's simply available in the underground and purchased by various competitors in the pharmaceutical business to spy on each other.

At the same time, the "Nemesis Gemina" project focuses on government, diplomatic, energy, military and telecom operators.

One of the big questions here is: Are the Miniduke attackers still "elite"? Though the old malware is still in use, the new malware is no longer pure assembler; instead, it's written in C/C++.

The new samples of Miniduke/CosmicDuke use a powerful obfuscator. For almost all of the samples we analyzed, it jumps to the beginning of dynamic PE loader - always from the same "l33t" address (if memory layout allowed it during the bot construction):



Hence, you could say that CosmicDuke is still "l33t"!

FireEye Uncovers Android Remote Access Malware

Threatpost for B2B - Wed, 07/02/2014 - 16:26
A new piece of Android malware leaks data, steals banking credentials, hijacks bank accounts, and serves as a remote access tool.

Critical Vulnerability in WordPress Plugin Could Allow Site Takeover

Threatpost for B2B - Wed, 07/02/2014 - 11:51
Wordpress users that have the MailPoet newsletter plugin installed are being cautioned to upgrade immediately.

Microsoft Says ‘Technical Error’ Led to Legitimate No-IP Customers Losing Service

Threatpost for B2B - Wed, 07/02/2014 - 09:59
Microsoft admits that it made a technical mistake as part of its No-IP.com malware operation takedown, errors that resulted in legitimate customers of the site losing service.

EFF Sues NSA, ODNI Over Zero-Day Disclosure Processes

Threatpost for B2B - Wed, 07/02/2014 - 08:00
The EFF filed a FOIA lawsuit against the NSA and ODNI looking for more information on the government's use and disclosure of zero-day vulnerabilities.

Microsoft Expands TLS, Forward Secrecy Support

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 14:42
Microsoft announced TLS support on Outlook.com and that OneDrive cloud storage now supports Perfect Forward Secrecy.

NSA Searched Section 702 Content Data for U.S. Identifiers 198 Times in 2013

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 14:35
The U.S. intelligence community historically has been loathe to release virtually any information about the way that its agencies operates, to the point that the existence of some of those agencies themselves was secret for decades. But in the wake of the Snowden leaks, more and more information is beginning to trickle out, and the […]

Following Controversy, PayPal Unfreezes Secure E-mail Startup’s Account

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 13:57
PayPal unfroze the account of Swiss secure email upstart ProtonMail late this morning, freeing at least $275,000 the service had raised left in limbo.

Apple Patches Security Vulnerabilities in Mavericks, iOS, Safari

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 13:20
Apple updates Mavericks, iOS, Safari, and AppleTV with a long list of patches for critical security vulnerabilities.

Cridex Variant Geodo Part Trojan, Part Email Worm

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 12:22
A variant of the Cridex malware, called Geodo, steals data from compromised machines and comes with a self-replicating feature built from a list of 50,000 stolen SMTP credentials.

Latest Microsoft Malware Takedown Causes Waves in Security Community

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 10:24
Microsoft's latest takedown of a malware operation, announced Monday and involving the infrastructure of several malware families, has, like many of the company's actions, elicited strong opinions on both sides of the issue from security researchers, activists and others with a stake in the game

Microsoft seizes 22 NO-IP domains, disrupts cybercriminal and nation state APT malware operations

Secure List feed for B2B - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 08:00

NO-IP is one of the many Dynamic DNS providers out there, which can be used for free to register a subdomain on top of popular names such as servepics.com or servebeer.com . For a long time, this has been a favorite method for cybercriminals who wanted to register easy to update hostnames to control their malware implants. Yesterday, Microsoft moved against NO-IP and seized 22 of their domains. They also filed a civil case against Mohamed Benabdellah and Naser Al Mutairi, and a U.S. company, Vitalwerks Internet Solutions, LLC (doing business as No-IP.com), for their roles in creating, controlling, and assisting in infecting millions of computers with malicious software harming Microsoft, its customers and the public at large.

Interestingly, Microsoft cited two specific malware families which were used to infect innocent victims with the Bladabindi (NJrat) and Jenxcus (NJw0rm) family of malware . These have been used by multiple cybercriminal and activist groups to target users, including the (in-)famous Syrian Electronic Army. (stay tuned for a more detailed blog on that soon)

In addition to these, the takedown disrupted many other APT operations, which used NO-IP for their C&C infrastructure. These include:

Based on our statistics, the shutdown has affected in some form at least 25% of the APT groups we are tracking. Some of these hosts that were previously used in large and sophisticated cyberespionage operations are now pointing to what appears to be a Microsoft sinkhole, at 204.95.99.59.

Some top level domains that have been taken away from Vitalwerks and now use Microsoft's DNS infrastructure include:

  • BOUNCEME.NET
  • MYFTP.BIZ
  • MYVNC.COM
  • NO-IP.BIZ
  • NO-IP.INFO
  • REDIRECTME.NET
  • SERVEBEER.COM
  • SERVEBLOG.NET
  • SERVECOUNTERSTRIKE.COM
  • SERVEGAME.COM
  • SERVEHALFLIFE.COM
  • SERVEHTTP.COM
  • SERVEMP3.COM
  • SERVEPICS.COM
  • SERVEQUAKE.COM
  • SYTES.NET

In the meantime, NO-IP / Vitalwerks have published their answer online:

Apparently, the Microsoft infrastructure is not able to handle the billions of queries from our customers. Millions of innocent users are experiencing outages to their services because of Microsoft s attempt to remediate hostnames associated with a few bad actors.

We think yesterday s events have dealt a major blow to many cybercriminal and APT operations around the world.

In the future, we can assume these groups will be more careful on using Dynamic DNS providers and rely more often on hacked websites and direct IP addresses to manage their C&C infrastructure.

Update (2014-07-02): Microsoft published a list of over 20,000 NO-IP hosts that were used in attacks, together with other documents on a specially crafted website for this incident.

Since the publication of our blogpost, many people have contacted us and complained about disruption of their otherwise clean hosts due to the Microsoft takedown. In fact, two hosts previously used in APT attacks that we were sinkholing were also taken away from us. We were using the logs from these, together with other data from our sinkhole to notify victims in many different countries.

Update (2014-07-04): NO-IP just sent a note to their customers that all 23 domains that were seized by Microsoft are now back in their control. This appears to be true, with Microsoft DNS servers no longer controlling the domains.

Have you been affected about the NO-IP takedown? Please let us know by sharing your comments below.


Blog: Microsoft seizes 22 NO-IP domains, disrupts cybercriminal and nation state APT malware operations

Secure List feed for B2B - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 04:09
Microsoft seized 22 domains previously owned by Vitalwerks, company behind dynamic dns service NO-IP

Spam in May 2014

Secure List feed for B2B - Mon, 06/30/2014 - 17:08
Spam in the spotlight

In the run-up to the summer, spammers offered their potential customers seedlings and seeds for gardening. In addition, English-language festive spam in May was dedicated to Mother's Day - the attackers sent out adverts offering flowers and candies.

Holiday spam for Mom

As usual, the spammers were very busy in the run-up to the Mother's Day celebration in May, sending out adverts for flowers and candies ahead of the holiday. To get the attention of the recipient, the subject of the email contained the name of the holiday while the body of the message included colorfully decorated promises of generous discounts and prompt delivery.

However, most links in these emails redirected the user to completely different pages instead of the advertised sites. The redirects went to newly created domains which were used not only in the links in the body of the message but also as a server domain name in the sender address. Some emails also included a link which would supposedly enable recipients to unsubscribe from further mailings. In fact, this link was used to collect users' email addresses and send them new spam messages.

Spam for gardeners

It's no secret that Americans are enthusiastic about their gardens - and gardening is one of the most popular hobbies in the country. With summer fast approaching, the spammers started spreading more offers of seeds for lawns and flowers, as well as berries and fruits. Potential buyers were lured in by phrases like "special," "limited offer" and offers of a free plant for every two bought. The messages included colorful images and contained a link. Interestingly, most of the domains to which these links led had been created less than a week before launching the mass mailing.

Diplomas and degrees

In May, we came across a lot of mailings advertising schools and colleges that provided distance learning services. However, there were also mailings in which spammers invited users to simply buy a qualification. All that was required was to make a donation to a church, which would then officially award an honorary doctorate to the benefactor.

In Germany, for example, only universities and similar higher education institutions have the right to award doctorates. However, the situation is somewhat different when it comes to so-called honorary doctorate degrees that are awarded on behalf of a church. Although getting this doctorate does not entail any learning or writing of dissertations, the spam mailings used images of students and other university themes to advertise the service.

There were also many offers to help struggling graduates repay their student loans. These messages urged recipients to follow a link to a site where they would find adverts for organizations that recruit volunteers and staff for non-profit institutions. In the US it is possible to enroll in state programs that offer credits to people who do some kind of service for their community, and these credits can offset student loans. However, the mailings came from unknown accounts that regularly change their email addresses, and not from an official source. The links in the messages went to newly created websites that prompted users to submit personal data.

To get the recipient interested, such emails often contained a personal appeal: "Still can't repay your student loan? I've found an interesting program for you that is definitely worth reading. It will help significantly reduce your monthly payments".

Insuring everyone against everything

Yet another popular topic last month was insuring against different risks, mainly life insurance, although we saw offers of car insurance.

These mailings aimed to redirect users to sites where they could compare the cost of insurance cover from different insurers and choose the most favorable terms. In other cases, the links in the emails led to the spammer parked page where the visitor was offered a wider choice of the types of insurance, companies and programs. Having made his choice and clicked on one of the proposed options, the user entered another resource. The links in the messages might also lead to a site advertising one particular insurance company; typically it was a recently established medium-sized firm.

One unusual type of insurance offer that was limited to English-speaking spam, was burial insurance. In fact, it is an extended version of life insurance: a larger insurance premium means the insurance policy includes funeral services in the event of a sudden death. In May, such messages came in the form of images containing a hyperlink leading to the notorious parked page of the insurance company. These links varied from email to email, but they were always based on different domains registered by the spammers shortly before launching the mailings.

The percentage of spam in email traffic

The percentage of spam in email traffic in May averaged 69.8%, which is 1.3 percentage points less than in April. The highest spam levels were seen during the third week of the month (72.1%), and the lowest levels were seen in the middle of the month (69%).

Malicious attachments in email

The graph below shows the Top 10 malicious programs spread by email in May.

Once again Trojan-Spy.HTML.Fraud.gen tops the charts. This threat appears as an HTML phishing website and sends email disguised as an important notification from banks, online stores, and other services.

In May, representatives of the Bublik family occupied 2nd, 3rd, 5th, 7th and 10th places. In the previous month eight of the top 10 malicious programs were part of this group. Their main functionality is the unauthorized download and installation of new versions of malware onto victim computers. Once the task is fulfilled, the program does not remain active: it copies itself into the %temp% file imitating an Adobe application or document. Trojan.Win32.Bublik.cpik and Trojan.Win32.Bublik.cpil download the notorious ZeuS/Zbot. Although this malicious program is able to execute a variety of malicious actions it is most often used to steal banking information. It can also install CryptoLocker, a malicious program that encrypts user data and demands a ransom to decipher it.

Trojan-Banker.Win32.ChePro.ilc, a banking Trojan targeting the users of Brazilian banks, came fourth. As is typical for this type of malware, it steals bank information and passwords.

Ninth place was occupied by Trojan.Win32.Pakes.agxu, a piece of spyware that intercepts keystrokes, collects screenshots from victim computers and sends the harvested information to the criminal's email address.

The UK was the country with the highest proportion of email antivirus detections with 13.5% (up 3.5 percentage points from April). The US (9.9%) dropped to second. Germany (8.2%) stayed in third.

Columbia (1.83%) was a new entry to the top 20 in May while Russia dropped off the list.

The percentage of email antivirus detections in other countries did not change much in May.

Special features of malicious spam

The insurance theme did not just feature in spam advertising this month - it was also used in mass mailings that spread malicious attachments. For example, we came across German-language messages with the subject "You have not paid your monthly premium", with a warning that next month the interest rate would change. These emails contained a link to allegedly more detailed information and once the recipient clicked on it, a ZIP archive with the name 'Dokumentation' (documentation) or 'Rechnung' (bill) was downloaded on the computer. In both cases the archive contained Backdoor.Win32.Androm.dsqy. This member of the Andromeda family is a backdoor that allows attackers to control infected computers while remaining unnoticed. The infected computers often become part of a botnet.

In May, the attackers sent out fake notifications on behalf of the popular iTunes Store. The recipient was informed about the alleged purchase of an application; the email even specified the name of the product and the price. The attached file, which was supposedly the invoice, in fact contained Trojan-Banker.Win32.Shiotob.f. This family of Trojans steals passwords stored in FTP clients and monitors browser traffic to intercept login details.

Customers of energy company E.ON, which generates and supplies electricity and heating in many countries, were also targeted by a similar scam. An email with the company logo sent on behalf of E.ON read: "This email is to bring to your notice that we were unable to process your last payment. See the details in the attachment". The attached archive contained Trojan-Spy.Win32.Zbot.svvs, a representative of the popular Zbot family designed to steal personal data, especially banking information.

Phishing

In May, Email search sites (32.2%) topped the rating of organizations most frequently targeted by phishers with a slight growth of 0.5 percentage points from the previous month. Second came Social networks (23.9%), headed by Facebook. Financial and payment organizations were in third place with 12.8% (+0.2 percentage points) followed by Online stores (12.1%) whose share also grew 0.2 percentage points from April. The percentage of attacks targeting Telephone and Internet service providers fell by 0.4 percentage points compared with the previous month.The ranking is based on Kaspersky Lab's anti-phishing component detections that are triggered every time a user attempts to click on a phishing link, regardless of whether the link is in a spam email or on a web page.

Fake tax notifications are frequently sent by fraudsters in order to install various malware on users' computers. In May, we came across a fake notification supposedly sent on behalf of the State Tax Service of South Africa. The attachment contained a phishing HTML page rather than a malicious file. The attackers tried to persuade the recipient to enter his bank card details into a form on the pretext of returning overpaid tax. To make the page look legitimate the scammers used the logo of the Service and in the 'From' field they specified not only the name of the government organization but also its official address - sars.gov.za - as the server domain name.


Conclusion

The proportion of spam in global email traffic in May dropped 1.3 percentage points and averaged 69.8%.

The summer season and the end of the school year were used by spammers to spread tourism-themed spam advertising different summer vacation ideas for children, offers of help with academic work and invitations to buy ready-made qualifications from any higher education establishment. The annual increase in the quantity of tourist spam in the run-up to the holiday season is expected this summer too.

Mother's Day was actively used in English-language spam to advertise various gifts. Insurance was another popular theme in May. Most Russian-language adverts offered car insurance, while in the English-speaking segment it was mostly life insurance.

The list of malware spread by email was again topped by Trojan-Spy.HTML.Fraud.gen. There were fewer members of the Bublik family in the May ranking - just five, compared with eight in April.

In May there was no big change in the organizations most frequently targeted by phishers. Email search sites (32.2%) were in first place, followed by Social networks (23.9%). Financial and payment organizations (12.8%) completed the top three.

Analysis: Spam in May 2014

Secure List feed for B2B - Mon, 06/30/2014 - 07:00
In the run-up to the summer, spammers offered their potential customers seedlings and seeds for gardening. In addition, English-language festive spam in May was dedicated to Mother’s Day - the attackers sent out adverts offering flowers and candies.

Blog: RECON 2014

Secure List feed for B2B - Sun, 06/29/2014 - 19:07
Today was the last day of the REcon 2014 conference where reverse engineers from all over the world meet and share their research. The event started with trainings, where I (Nicolas) gave a 4 days training on malware reverse engineering. During those 4 days, we covered various kind of topics such as how to unpack/decrypt malware, identify cryptography algorithms, deal with obfuscated code, analyze shellcode etc.
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