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Crowdsourcing Finding its Security Sweet Spot

Threatpost for B2B - Wed, 06/25/2014 - 09:41
Private and commercial businesses are starting to find some comfort in crowdsourcing security research into application vulnerabilities,.

Luuuk Fraud Campaign Steals €500K From Bank in One Week

Threatpost for B2B - Wed, 06/25/2014 - 08:27
A fraud campaign stole more than half a million dollars from a European bank in a week earlier this year, researchers with Kaspersky Lab announced this week.

HackingTeam 2.0: The Story Goes Mobile

Secure List feed for B2B - Tue, 06/24/2014 - 13:04

More than a year has passed since the release of our last article on HackingTeam, the Italian company that develops a "legal" spyware tool known as Remote Control System, or short, RCS. In the meantime a lot has been happened, so it's time for an update on all our current research findings on the RCS malware.

Locating the command servers

One of the most important things we've uncovered during our long and extensive research is a specific feature than can be used to fingerprint the RCS command servers (C2s). We presented details of this method at the Virus Bulletin 2013 conference.

To summarize, when a special request is sent to a "harmless" HackingTeam RCS C&C server, the RCS C&C responds with the following error message:


Slide from our VB presentation with HackingTeam's C2 fingerprint

First of all, the codename 'RCS' is there, all right. What we weren't sure about was the 'Collector' referred to in the response. This probably refers to the fact that the server "collects" information from the victims. We used this particular fingerprinting method to scan the entire IPv4 space, which allowed us to find all the IP addresses of the RCS C2s around the world and plot them nicely to a map showing their locations. šWe pinpointed a grand total of 326 C2s.

Count of C2s Country name 64 UNITED STATES 49 KAZAKHSTAN 35 ECUADOR 32 UNITED KINGDOM 24 CANADA 15 CHINA 12 COLOMBIA 7 POLAND 7 NEW ZEALAND 6 PERU 6 INDONESIA 6 BRAZIL 6 BOLIVIA 6 ARGENTINA 5 RUSSIAN FEDERATION 5 INDIA 4 HONG KONG 4 AUSTRALIA 3 SPAIN 2 SAUDI ARABIA 2 MALAYSIA 2 ITALY 2 GERMANY 2 FRANCE 2 EGYPT 1 UKRAINE 1 THAILAND 1 SWEDEN 1 SINGAPORE 1 ROMANIA 1 PARAGUAY 1 MOROCCO 1 LITHUANIA 1 KENYA 1 JAPAN 1 IRELAND 1 HUNGARY 1 DENMARK 1 CZECH REPUBLIC 1 CYPRUS 1 Other 1 BELGIUM 1 AZERBAIJAN


Map showing the countries of the current HackingTeam servers’ locations

The largest amount of identified servers was in the US, Kazakhstan and Ecuador. Unfortunately, we can’t be sure that the servers in a certain country are used by that specific country’s LEAs; however, it would make sense for LEAs to put their C&Cs in their own countries in order to avoid cross-border legal problems and the seizure of servers.  Nevertheless, several IPs were identified as “government” related based on their WHOIS information and they provide a good indication of who owns them.

Mobile modules

It was a well-known fact for quite some time that HackingTeam products included malware for mobile phones. However, these were rarely seen. In particular, the Android and iOS Trojans have never been identified before and represented one of the remaining blank spots in the story. Earlier this year, we discovered a number of mobile malware modules coming from HackingTeam for the following platforms:

  • Android
  • iOS
  • Windows Mobile
  • BlackBerry

All these modules are controlled by the same configuration type, which is a good indication that they are related and belong to the same product family.


Configuration file from the RCS mobile modules

Certainly, our main interest during the analysis of the mobile modules was in iOS and Android, due to their popularity. The iOS module works only on jailbroken devices. Here is a description of the main functionality of the iOS module:

  • Control of Wi-Fi, GPS, GPRS
  • Recording voice
  • E-mail, SMS, MMS
  • Listing files
  • Cookies
  • Visited URLs
  • Cached web pages
  • Address book
  • Call history
  • Notes
  • Calendar
  • Clipboard
  • List of apps
  • SIM change
  • Live microphone
  • Camera shots
  • Support chats, WhatsApp, Skype, Viber
  • Log keystrokes from all apps and screens via libinjection


Disassembled code of the iOS module

The Android module is protected by the DexGuard optimizer/obfuscator and is therefore extremely difficult to analyze. However, we discovered (see the trace below) that the sample has all the functionality of the iOS module listed above - plus support for hijacking information from the following applications:

  • com.tencent.mm
  • com.google.android.gm
  • android.calendar
  • com.facebook
  • jp.naver.line.android
  • com.google.android.talk


Trace of an RCS Android sample

Mobile infectors

Another aspect of particular interest to us was the way the malware samples are installed on mobile devices. We discovered several modules that infect mobile devices connected to infected Windows or Mac OS X computers.

As already mentioned, the iOS module can only be used on jailbroken devices. That is why the iOS infector uses the AFP2 protocol to transfer. The "infector" has a nice GUI that enables installation if there is physical access to the victim's device or remote admin access to an infected computer.


Main window of the iOS infector

iPhone1,1 iPhone1,2 iPhone2,1 iPhone3,1 iPhone3,2 iPhone3,3 iPhone4,1 iPhone5,1 iPhone5,2 iPad1,1 iPad2,1 iPad2,2 iPad2,3 iPad2,4 iPad3,1 iPad3,2 iPad3,3 iPad3,4 iPad3,5 iPad3,6 iPhone iPhone 3G iPhone 3GS iPhone 4 iPhone 4 iPhone 4 (cdma) iPhone 4s iPhone 5 (gsm) iPhone 5 iPad iPad2 (Wi-Fi) iPad2 (gsm) iPad2 (cdma) iPad2 (Wi-Fi) iPad3 (Wi-Fi) iPad3 (gsm) iPad3 iPad4 (Wi-Fi) iPad4 (gsm) iPad4    

List of Apple devices supported by the iOS infector

After successfully connecting, the iOS infector copies several files to iOS and runs an install.sh file:


Part of the install.sh file that is run on an infected iOS device

As mentioned above, remote admin access to an infected computer is one of the possible ways for the malware to be installed on a connected mobile device. The fact that only jailbroken iOS devices are supported can be a limiting factor. However, this is not a huge problem since an attacker can also run a jailbreaking tool such as Evasi0n via the same infected computer. In this case the only thing that can protect a user from a remote jailbreak and infection is the mobile device’s passcode. However, if the device is unlocked while connected to the infected computer, it can be infected by the attacker.

Another interesting mobile infector is the one for BlackBerry devices, which uses the JavaLoader application to load malware samples on BB 4.5 and 5.0. In its disassembled code, we found a path to the PDB debug file, which appears to have been mistakenly forgotten by the authors. The original project was located in the ‘C:\HT\RCSBlackBerry\Workspace\RCS_BB_Infection_Agent\’ when this malware was created.


Part of the code of a Blackberry infector with a path to the PDB file

Summary

In this latest installment of our ongoing research, we uncovered a huge infrastructure that is used to control the RCS malware implants. Our latest research has indentified mobile modules that work on all well-known mobile platforms, including as Android and iOS. These modules are installed using infectors - special executables for either Windows or Macs that run on already infected computers. They translate into complete control over the environment in and near a victim’s computer. Secretly activating the microphone and taking regular camera shots provides constant surveillance of the target - which is much more powerful than traditional cloak and dagger operations.

The new data we are publishing on HackingTeam’s RCS is extremely important because it shows the level of sophistication and scale of these surveillance tools. We like to think that if we’re able to protect our customers from such advanced threats, then we’ll sure have no trouble with lesser, more common threats like those posed by cybercriminals.

Appendix:

MD5s of mobile infectors:

  • 14b03ada92dd81d6ce57f43889810087 - BlackBerry infector
  • 35c4f9f242aae60edbd1fe150bc952d5 - iOS infector

MD5s of Android samples:

  • ff8e7f09232198d6529d9194c86c0791
  • 36ab980a954b02a26d3af4378f6c04b4
  • a2a659d66e83ffe66b6d728a52130b72
  • 9f06db99d2e5b27b01113f78b745ff28
  • a43ea939e883cc33fc766dd0bcac9f6a
  • a465ead1fd61afe72238306c7ed048fe

MD5s of Windows samples:

  • bf8aba6f7640f470a8f75e9adc5b940d
  • b04ab81b9b796042c46966705cd2d201
  • 1be71818a228e88918dac0a8140dbd34
  • c7268b341fd68cf334fc92269f07503a

List of active C2s on 19.06.2014:

  • 50.63.180.***
  • 146.185.30.***
  • 204.188.221.***
  • 91.109.17.***
  • 106.186.17.***
  • 119.59.123.***
  • 95.141.46.***
  • 192.71.245.***
  • 106.187.99.***
  • 93.95.219.***
  • 106.187.96.***
  • 124.217.245.***
  • 23.92.30.***
  • 82.146.58.***
  • 93.95.219.***
  • 209.59.205.***

RCS modules (using Kaspersky Lab’s classification names):

  • Backdoor.OSX.Morcut
  • Rootkit.OSX.Morcut
  • Trojan.OSX.Morcut
  • Backdoor.Win32.Korablin
  • Backdoor.Win64.Korablin
  • Rootkit.Win32.Korablin
  • Rootkit.Win64.Korablin
  • Trojan.Multi.Korablin
  • Trojan-Dropper.Win32.Korablin
  • Backdoor.AndroidOS.Criag
  • Trojan-Spy.AndroidOS.Mekir
  • Trojan.Win32.BBInfector
  • Trojan.Win32.IOSinfector
  • Trojan.OSX.IOSinfector
  • Trojan-Spy.IphoneOS.Mekir
  • Trojan-Spy.WinCE.Mekir
  • Trojan-Spy.BlackberryOS.Mekir

Dramatic Drop in Vulnerable NTP Servers Used in DDoS Attacks

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 06/24/2014 - 11:39
95 percent of vulnerable NTP servers leveraged in massive DDoS attacks earlier this year have been patched, but the remaining servers still have experts concerned.

AskMen Site Compromised by Nuclear Pack Exploit Kit

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 06/24/2014 - 09:10
Users who visit AskMen.com, a men’s entertainment and lifestyle portal, are being hit with malicious code – possibly stemming from the Nuclear Pack exploit kit - researchers announced today.

Researchers Go Inside HackingTeam Mobile Malware, Command Infrastructure

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 06/24/2014 - 09:03
Researchers from Kaspersky Lab and Citizen Lab released a report today with extensive details on the HackingTeam's controversial RCS spyware, in particular its extensive global command infrastructure and mobile malware.

OpenSSL Heartbleed Patch Progress Slowing Two Months Later

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 06/23/2014 - 16:51
More than two months after it emerged, more than 300,000 machines on port 443 remain vulnerable to the OpenSSL Heartbleed security vulnerability.

Threatpost News Wrap, June 23, 2014

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 06/23/2014 - 15:17
Dennis Fisher and Mike Mimoso discuss the latest security news, including the possible fork of TrueCrypt, Microsoft’s new information sharing platform, the FBI’s cybercrime task force and the US team’s crushing tie with Portugal. Download: digital_underground_156.mp3 Music by Chris Gonsalves  

Blog: The Rise of Cybercrime in Dubai and UAE

Secure List feed for B2B - Mon, 06/23/2014 - 13:20
Dubai today has become a global city and a business hub, same is going for threats and malware attacks, UAE is the most attacked country in the Middle East. In this report we highlight the most popular and dangerous threats and attacks, in addition to possible solutions to handle such threats.

The Rise of Cybercrime in Dubai and UAE

Secure List feed for B2B - Mon, 06/23/2014 - 12:35

A lot of our everyday communication and commercial activities are now taking place online, the threat from cybercrime is increasing, targeting citizens, businesses and governments at a rapidly growing rate.

Organizations and individuals are worried about the increase of Cybercrime, not just because of financial damage, but loss of privacy and intellectual property, in addition to reputation problems.

Recent statistics have shown dramatic growth in the Cybercrime in the UAE. Emerging markets have long been of interest for Cyber criminals.

Official statistics from Dubai have shown a dramatic 88% increase in the number of electronic crime cases reported in 2013 compared to the year before. The cyber investigation department of Dubai Police received a total of 1,419 reports in 2013, 792 in 2012 and 588 in 2011.

Kaspersky malware statistics in the UAE and worldwide

The increase in the number of attacks in the UAE and the region is also reflected by the number of attacks and infection attempts detected by Kaspersky Security Network in the region. The KSN cloud network uses the latest intelligence technologies to enable the reporting and analysis of threats around the world.

Kaspersky top Malware detections statistics for 2014 in the world Adware.Win32.Amonetize.heur 3,700,000+ Worm.VBS.Dinihou.r 1,800,000+ Virus.Win32.Sality.gen 1,780,000+ AdWare.Win32.BetterSurf.b 1,500,000+ AdWare.Win32.Yotoon.heur 1,500,000+ Exploit.Win32.CVE-2010-2568.gen 1,388,000+ Worm.Win32.Debris.a 1,094,000+ Trojan.Win32.Starter.lgb 1,007,000+ AdWare.Win32.Skyli.a 883,000+ Exploit.Java.Generic 850,000+ Trojan.Win32.AntiFW.b 829,000+ Virus.Win32.Nimnul.a 713,000+ Trojan.WinLNK.Runner.ea 676,000+ Why is cybercrime surging in the UAE?

The last few years have seen huge increase in the use of smart electronic devices and Internet services, all these devices are connected to the Internet.

Increasing use of online services

According to recent statistics Internet penetration has reached 92% in the UAE. Most people now use online services, including the transfer of financial and personal information to fulfill their day-to-day needs, and the most popular services are as follows:

  1. E-Government transactions, e-bills
  2. E-banking
  3. E-shopping

While the benefits of using online services are obvious, there are also threats that target user information.

Smartphone Threats

Many people in the UAE and Gulf region have smart mobile devices. These have many benefits and allow anyone to easily access services and activities online. These devices are expensive, so users often wrongly assume they have some kind of default protection.

Android is the most targeted mobile platform. At Kaspersky Lab we now have more than 10 million unique Android malware samples in our databases.

In Q1 2014, more than 99% of all mobile malware targeted Android devices. Detections over the past three months included:

  • 1 258 436 installation packages,
  • 110 324 new malicious programs for mobile devices,
  • 1 182 new mobile banking Trojans.
Financial Motivation

The huge increase in the use of online payment and e-services, in addition to the wide availability of unprotected smartphones, has encouraged cyber-criminals to target users with malware and phishing attacks affecting all types of devices.

Just like offline crime, money is a prime motive, especially when the risks of a criminal life are less apparent when you're hiding being a computer screen. The perception of low risk and high financial reward stimulates many cyber criminals to participate in identity theft and fraudulent activities.

Personal Motivation

Human beings and the crimes they commit are often motivated by personal emotions and vendettas. From irritated employees to jealous boyfriends, many crimes have their roots in powerful passions.

Ideological and Political Motivation

These kinds of attacks are carried out for moral, ideological or political reasons, damaging or disabling online services and networks to protest against individuals, corporations or governments. Anonymous group is a popular example of ideologically motivated hackers.

The most dangerous attacks on users in the UAE Banking Malware

The UAE is a country well known for its concentration of financial resources. Banking malware targets user devices to steal financial information like credit card details and bank account passwords. The criminals then use this stolen information to transfer money from the compromised accounts.

The most popular banking malware in the UAE are as follows:

  • Zeus (Windows)
  • Carberp (Windows)
  • mToken (Android)

Zeus and Carberp have long been popular malware for Windows computers and widely available public source code has enabled criminals to develop many variants of these. Zeus Gameover, the latest variant of Zeus has hit hard in the UAE, the third most affected country in the world. Zeus Gameover was taken down by the FBI and Microsoft on 2nd of June 2014.


Number of Zeus and Carberp attacks, and files blocked between 5 and 12 June 2014 in UAE

mToken was first recognized and reported by the Intercrawler organization. This is a different type of malware that mainly targets Android devices. It is used to steal banking usernames and passwords, in addition to stealing SMS token messages from the banks. There were 513,000 mToken attacks in Q1 2014 in the GCC region according to statistics from the Telecommunications Regulatory Authority. The mToken disguises itself as a banking token generator for some of the most popular banks in KSA and UAE Most of its victims are in the United Arab Emirates and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Kaspersky Lab products have detected and blocked Zeus variants since 2010 and Mtoken variants since 2012.

Ransomware: Lockers and Crypters

Lockers and Encrypters are ransomware trojans. An attack may come from several sources; one example is disguised as an authentic email attachment.

Some Lockers can be removed with no damage to the system or files, others harm files by encrypting them using RSA public-key cryptography where only the hackers have the keys to decrypt and recover the files.

The malware displays a message which offers to unlock/decrypt the device and data if a payment is made by a stated deadline (through either Bitcoin or a pre-paid coupon), and threatens to delete the key if the deadline passes.

Lockers and Encrypters mainly target Windows devices but recently we have seen versions for Android.


Number of ransomware attacks and files blocked between 5 and 12 June 2014 in UAE


Even though it is old, CashU malware is still active in the UAE


Cryptolocker encrypts your files and they can only be recovered using the hacker's key


Ransomware targeting Android devices, disguised as a protection application

The most popular attacks in the UAE

The total number of attacks from Jan-May 2014 is 12,713,890

Top 3 Adware in the UAE in 2014 AdWare.Win32.BetterSurf.b 1,228,000+ AdWare.Win32.BrainInst.u 1,189,000+ AdWare.Win32.BHO.batb 680,000+ Top 3 malware attacks in the UAE in 2014 Virus.Win32.Sality.gen 378,000+ Net-Worm.Win32.Kido.ih 348,000+ Exploit.Win32.CVE-2010-2568.gen 339,000+

Sality virus: blocks some security functions and utilities on Windows computers. It also tries to download malware from other servers. It infects Windows files and copies itself to removable and remote drives.

Kido worm: also known as conficker, is malware that targets the Windows operating system, mainly attacking the MS08-067 vulnerability; it also uses dictionary attacks on administrator passwords to spread and create a botnet.

CVE-2010-2568 is one of the most popular weaknesses in the Microsoft Operating system. When exploited by malware attacks, it allows a user to execute code via shortcut file (.lnk) that is not properly handled by the operating system.

Sality virus, Kido worm and the CVE-2010-2568 exploit are legacy attacks which were used to infect millions of machines worldwide. They are still widespread because they can easily infect new machines or they are publicly available for the criminals to use which explains the high success rates if a device is not protected.

These recent statistics suggest that the most popular malware and adware in the UAE are not new:

First Date of malware detection by Family BetterSurf adware Oct 2013 BrainInst adware Dec 2013 BHO adware Mar 2006 Sality virus Oct 2009 Kido worm Nov 2008 CVE-2010-2568 exploit Jul 2010

The main reasons why old attacks are still very successful are as follows:

  • The absence of correct patching on the user operating systems
  • The use of unlicensed software
  • The lack of security software to protect the user devices against the latest threats
  • The lack of good practices for handling smart devices, like good passwords and awareness on cyber security
Conclusion and future expectations

Most malware works in stealth mode. It doesn't announce itself on a PC or mobile device, preferring to monitor and steal information and then use it to steal your money or reveal themselves while extorting money. In most cases criminals are not very interested in the information on most personal or business computers. But this data is vital to the owner, and criminals manipulate the need for confidentiality, integrity and availability to cause financial and reputational damage to victims.

The UAE has a diverse, cosmopolitan and multicultural society and the accelerated economic growth in the region has encouraged cyber-criminals to excessively target citizens, using and adapting the latest trends in global cybercrime.

The increasing number and complexity of threats targeting users and businesses in the UAE requires better protection and awareness to defend against various cyber-threats.

You can follow me on twitter: @mahasbini

Google’s BoringSSL Latest OpenSSL Fork to Surface

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 06/23/2014 - 11:06
Google announced its fork of OpenSSL called BoringSSL, a version of the crypto libraries that will now import changes from OpenSSL.

Cisco Releases Open Source FNR Cipher

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 06/23/2014 - 10:57
Cisco has released a new open-source block cipher called FNR that is designed for encrypting small chunks of data, such as MAC addresses or IP addresses. The cipher is still in the experimental stage, but Cisco has released the source code and a demo application. The company suggests that the new cipher–called Flexible Naor and […]

Microsoft to Preview Interflow Information Sharing Platform

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 06/23/2014 - 09:03
A private preview of Microsoft's new Interflow security threat information-sharing platform opens this week. Interflow, built on industry standards such as STIX and TAXII, automates information sharing across industries.

House Amendment Limits Funding for NSA Surveillance

Threatpost for B2B - Fri, 06/20/2014 - 13:27
The House of Representatives yesterday passed an amendment that reins in NSA surveillance by cutting Department of Defense funds.
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