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Details Disclosed for Critical Vulnerability Patched in Webmin

Threatpost for B2B - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 15:56
The University of Texas information security office disclosed details of a vulnerability in remote management software Webmin that could allow someone to remotely delete files on a host server.

Five Million Email Passwords, Addresses Appear on Russian Bitcoin Forum

Threatpost for B2B - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 15:43
Five million email addresses showed up on a Russian Bitcoin security forum last night. Most of the leaked addresses belong to Gmail users.

CTIA's Super Mobility Week 2014

Secure List feed for B2B - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 15:31

The world's largest mobile innovation forum, "Super Mobility Week", is being held in Las Vegas. We were there to participate and moderate a panel on mobile and cloud cyber-security with speakers from Verizon, Samsung, and Eriksonn Mobile.

The event maintains an impressive vendor floor and multiple stages for discussions and panels throughout the days. The floor hosts vendors presenting their newest products, including wearables and other IoT. The afternoon keynotes yesterday brought a switch from the planned Twitter's CEO to their "President of Global Revenue" Mark Bain, who spoke about both their technology push onto wearables and IoT, and a glimpse into their data mining capabilities derived from their Gnip acquisition. It's notable that he didn't mention anything about security or privacy. Two factor authentication is ancient history for them, while Apple and their customers unfortunately continue to learn the hard way that some inconvenience is a small tradeoff for privacy and security.

Microsoft also keynoted, bringing their EVP of Devices Group onstage to discuss their push into mobile to cloud technologies with Nokia devices and "Cloud OS". Again, no mention of security baked into these technologies, although we haven't seen any recent naked celebrity photo theft from the Microsoft cloud.

My panel's discussion weaved mainly in and out of enterprise wide security challenges to BYOD and cloud adoption, along with recent and relevant threats that we noted:

1. The recent Apple iCloud mess revealed several things

  • Apple provided password and knowledge based authentication services that enabled social engineering and brute force attacks and dismissed 2FA (until now). On cloud service authentication security, Apple "led from behind"
  • Apple's cloud security enabled brute forcing of both AppleIDs and iCloud passwords
  • In general, mobile to cloud customers have no idea of where their data resides, if it or how much of it flows off of their mobile device, how many organizations have access to it, or how well it is secured

2. Mobile malware volumes continue to surge - our mobile malware collection now includes almost half a million samples. Digging deeper, in 2013, we saw around 600 mobile banking trojans and now our malware collection maintains around 8,500 banker variants specifically supporting financial cybercrime.

3. Wifi and Ssl insecurities, as implemented in and used by mobile technologies, are on the increase and will likely continue to be.

4. Targeted attackers express interest in an expanded set of technologies, including various mobile devices by the Rocra, LuckyCat and Chuli attackers.

The event lasts from September 9th to the 11th.

Apache Warns of Tomcat Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Threatpost for B2B - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 15:31
Some older versions of Apache Tomcat, the company’s open source web server and servlet container, are vulnerable to remote code execution.

Information Sharing on Threats Seen as a Key for Auto Makers

Threatpost for B2B - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 10:20
A small segment of the security research community has been spending a lot of time tearing apart the innards of various vehicles and looking at ways that the computers and local networks that reside in modern cars can be hacked. There has been some remarkable success on this front, and while auto makers haven’t paid […]

The world at your fingertips… and theirs too

Secure List feed for B2B - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 07:00

Technology has changed our lives, the way we live and work. With the emergence of wearables, the convergence between the virtual and the physical world makes people feel more natural using technology all the time.Google Glass is one of the most amazing wearable devices and although it is still at an early stage of development, it is undeniable that you can do awesome things and experience the world in a different way with them.

With out-the-box functionality, you can search the internet, take pictures or videos, check mail, send messages to Hangouts contacts, or publish information to Google+. What truly excites us are foreseeable uses in fields like medicine or education. The device could become indispensable by helping surgeons check patient vital signs or video broadcasting their surgeries to other specialists. Similarly, we can foresee novel means of transmitting knowledge to students in interactive ways. Perhaps we can even imagine enhancements to law enforcement by enabling immediate recognition of wanted criminals.

Unfortunately, the emergence of new technologies also entails new security risks. There are in fact many concerns about potential risks to privacy and ways in which these new devices could be compromised. Cybercriminals don't rest and are always looking for new ways to obtain gains from their victims, whenever they see an opportunity they will work day and night to achieve this objective.

New Technologies, Old Risks.

New and existing devices have many things in common: they use the same protocols and are interconnected with other devices using similar applications. There is no way around this. Traditional attack vectors are mainly against the network layer in the form of Man-in-The-Middle (MiTM), the exploitation of some vulnerability in the operating system, or the applications themselves. Being based on Android, Glass could inherit known vulnerabilities found in other devices with the same OS.

There are two ways to surf the Web from Google Glass: through Bluetooth pairing to a mobile device that shares its data network connection, or directly through Wi-Fi with prior configuration of the network via a MyGlass account or mobile app generated QR code.

The procedure to add a network is pretty simple: by adding a network name and password a QR code is generated containing connection settings which when looked at through Glass establishes an automatic connection to the network.

Last year, a vulnerability was published by the Security firm Lookout related to this procedure that would mislead a user to connect to a fake access point through a malicious QR thus allowing a potential attacker to hijack network communications and possibly redirect navigation to a malicious web page that could exploit a known Android web vulnerability. This vulnerability was patched but gave us a clear sense that attackers could discover ways to compromise these new devices.

A source of potential risks is that unlike a computer or a mobile device, the Glass interface is navigated through 'cards' to scroll through the different applications and settings thus limiting configuration options and in some cases automating certain procedures and functions with little input from the user, as in the case of connecting to a network or sharing information. This automation opens the door for exploitation by attackers and the compromise of user privacy.

Another threat avenue is the propensity for users to activate 'debug mode' in order to install applications outside of the official glassware ecosystem thus raising the risk of installing malicious applications.

This opens the possibility of new attacks using old methods such as social engineering through the use of the magic words: "free" and "sex". Although not all apps advertised this way are malicious, the terms stand as a hook for users in search of new experiences, willing to step out of the comfort zone pre-arranged by the manufacturer.

One simple test

As mentioned earlier, a feature distinguishing Glass from other wearables is the ability to navigate the internet directly via a Wi-Fi connection, rather than exclusively piggybacking off of a paired mobile device. However, this ability also means that the device is exposed to network vectors attacks, particularly MiTM.

Imagine this scenario, you are at your favorite coffee shop and decide to connect to the Wi-Fi network using Glass. You set up the network and are off to check-in on Foursquare, launch an app to recognize the song playing in the background and fetch the lyrics. But what if in this network someone is using a tool to poison the other devices into redirecting traffic towards a router IP address thus capturing all of the network traffic?

We tested by doing just that in a controlled laboratory network. Once the network was compromised, we did some searches on google, standard site browsing, sent pictures and messages to some of our contacts, and even read the news.

Once we captured enough traffic to analyze, we found that almost all the traffic remains encrypted after the network was compromised, specially the google searches. However, we found enough information in plain text to correlate and piece together the user's navigation to airlines, hotels, and touristic destination sites and how and where the device was connected. Nothing too sensitive but in some cases useful for when carrying out a profiling job.

In the end, as with any other device, security must be visualized in layers and we need to protect every layer to reduce the risk of compromise. In this case, the network layer could be exposed since the device can connect to public networks but lacks the option for VPN connections thus insuring traffic can be captured and analyzed.

In coming months, we'll see wearable devices becoming the next attack targets, highlighting the need to pay special attention to these devices, their capabilities, and the information they handle.

You can also follow me on twitter @r0bertmart1nez

Wearable Security: Present and Future

Secure List feed for B2B - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 07:00

Now that the Internet of Things is all the rage, I wanted to take a look at a trend in IoT that I find particularly exciting and that's wearable devices. In theory, wearables could present us with a paradigm shift in the manner in which users interact with technology, moving us away from the old mouse and keyboard combo, and possibly even the touchscreen. For now, we are not quite there and science fiction superlatives are premature. At this time, wearables are in simplest terms appendages of our mobile phones. They're meant to more conveniently convey notifications, collect heartbeat measurements, and throw an alternate camera angle into the selfie-filled mix. Though wearables are still in their infancy, rising adoption highlights the need for a discussion about the concerns that could accompany these new technologies. Let's attempt to carry out this discussion in two modes: current privacy issues and future overall security concerns.

With Creepy Enthusiasm

Sadly technology isn't always used in the benevolently child-like way we intend; gone are the days of look-what-I-can-do wonderment.

Source: http://www.killyourdarlingsjournal.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/1963-jetsons-flintstones.jpeg

Instead, we see users adapting technologies old and new to satisfy base desires. A recent twitter-storm documented by Gawker showed just that, as a Chinese Glass Explorer was found using his new device to upload unsolicited pictures of women in public places to his twitter account. His actions fit into a reprehensible internet subculture of fetishizing 'creepshots' that has caused great uproar. Unfortunately, the principal design tenets of wearables have the unintended corollary of making perfect devices for this community of perverts.

With an unassuming device and a nearly undetectable camera, a wearable can be used as a predatory tool for violating the privacy of unsuspecting bystanders. During our Latin American Security Analysts Summit, Roberto Martinez and I took up the mantle of predatory wearable users, taking candid pictures of our guests to display during our presentation. I'm disappointed to say it was incredibly easy to get away with. In the case of Roberto's Glass, the wink feature (which allows the user to take a picture by simply winking in the direction of the target) was indispensable to our experiment. In my case, I had a Galaxy Gear 2 which Samsung had cautiously programmed to accompany pictures with a loud noise in order to alert nearby targets.

However, creepers will not be easily deterred! And a solution was swiftly proffered in the form of rooting and a handful of commands. Most people are familiar with the notion of rooting or jailbreaking a device these days. It is often touted as a means of retaking control of your device, away from the clutches of evil limiting corporations! In the case of the Gear 2, the uses of rooting are anything but benevolent. Rather than unleashing homebrew development creativity, the sole use of rooting the Gear 2 that I've been able to spot is to disable the moderately loud sound the device emits to notify passersby that they are in fact being photographed.

On more specific terms, the process includes the use of a leaked internal Samsung tool called ODIN in order to flash an alternate ROM onto the device that comes with root privileges enabled. Root privileges are not required in order to install applications themselves but will be necessary in order to mount the otherwise inaccessible filesystem. Once mounted, the creeper needs only zero-in on the folders that contain the camera notification sound files and move them elsewhere for safe-keeping. Thus, when a picture is being taken, the camera application will look for these files in vain and continue to take the picture sans shutter sound. Since the camera is quite discreetly placed, lacks a flash, and shows no other outward indication that a picture is being taken, this sound is a crucial privacy feature in the device's design.

With the Tizen Smart Developer Bridge (reminiscent of the Android Developer Bridge) in hand, semi-proficient users can also sideload applications in wgt format onto the device. In the case of video recordings, an altered camera app can be sideloaded that includes a single modified line within the package thus eliminating the pre-imposed limitation on video recording from a few seconds to as much as the cramped storage will allow. These two modifications allow a perverted user to turn the otherwise benevolent smartwatch into a rather creepy device.

The Less-Scrutinized Link in the Mobile Security Chain

An interesting implication arises from being able to sideload modified applications onto the device with such ease. Though Tizen applications are meant to go through a rigorous testing process, this process occurs on the side of the controlling device – in this case, the Galaxy S5 loaded with the Gear Manager app paired to the smartwatch. When an application is installed on the device through the Gear Manager app via bluetooth, there are no indications or notifications on the smartwatch that a new application has been installed. This goes to stress the perils of the simplified interfaces on most wearable devices and thus the importance of maintaining the integrity of the controlling mobile device. With Android being a primary target for mobile attackers, rising consumer interest in wearables is bound to be met by rising attacker interest in these devices as well, which brings us to the prospective side of our discussion…

Laymen cybercriminals are not the only one's interested in our devices. Sophisticated actors have a distinct interest in infecting mobile devices as these become the gateway for intimate information about individual targets not commonly found on corporate networks. Though I would in no way claim that wearables are being targeted by these actors at this time, there is a twofold appeal presented by wearables that make them a likely future target if widely adopted by consumers:

  • Firstly, the information wearables devices gather is going to attract new corporate players to the cyberespionage scene. If wearables are adopted by a large enough crowd, insurance companies interested in tweaking and improving their risk mitigation formulae will be jonesing to get their hands on the aggregated vital signs and unadulterated exercise details of their clients. This information could translate into real money for these companies and that sort of financial incentive is often enough to encourage less than ethical means of information gathering.
  • Secondly, we need to be wary and adopt a holistic approach towards the security of a chain of devices paired for data sharing. When it comes to a home or office network, securing endpoints isn't enough. Any device on the network, even if it's a printer or a seemingly harmless network storage device, can represent an entry point or means of persistence for an attacker. The same occurs with mobile devices and their less sophisticated accessories.

In an espionage campaign, breaching the security of a mobile device is only the beginning. Oftentimes, valuable information will become available with long-term access to the device as the unsuspecting target goes on about their everyday dealings. Given that security solutions are already deployed on mobile platforms, less sophisticated appendages such as wearables connected to mobile devices could become particularly interesting to advanced threat actors looking for a means of persistence with a lower probability of detection. In this case, resilience and discreet execution are gold standards, and what is more discreet than operating within a device whose simplified interface and inaccessible filesystem essentially insure that the breach will never be detected by even the most competent users?

EMET, AV Disclosure Leak Plugged in IE

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 14:40
Microsoft patched a disclosure leak in Internet Explorer that revealed whether EMET or other antimalware protections were running on a compromised computer.

Privacy Vulnerabilities in Popular Android Apps Disclosed

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 13:17
Researchers from the University of New Haven have taken to Youtube this week to publicize vulnerabilities in a dozen Android apps, including Instagram, Vine and OKCupid.

Adobe Patches Host of Memory Bugs in Flash Player

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 12:45
Adobe announced security updates and a new version of Flash Player for Windows, Mac and Linux; the company also announced it was postponing a scheduled update for Reader and Acrobat.

Research Finds No Large Scale Heartbleed Exploit Attempts Before Vulnerability Disclosure

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 11:23
In the days and weeks following the public disclosure of the OpenSSL Heartbleed vulnerability in April, security researchers and others wondered aloud whether there were some organizations–perhaps the NSA–that had known about the bug for some time and had been using it for targeted attacks. A definitive answer to that question may never come, but […]

More 1024-Bit Certificates to Be Deprecated in Firefox

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 08:37
When Mozilla released Firefox 32 last week, the company removed several root certificates from the trust store for the browser. The move wasn’t because the certificates were fraudulent or the CAs that issued them were compromised, but because the certificates use 1024-bit keys. This is the first step in a process that Mozilla officials say […]

Google ‘Sunsetting’ Weak SHA-1 Crypto Algorithm

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 08:26
Google has initiated a process to revoke trust from any certificates that rely on the outdated SHA-1crytpographic hash algorithm.

Home Depot Confirms Breach, Transactions From April On At Risk

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 19:23
Home Depot finally confirmed its payment systems have been breached, but offered little further on whether customer personal data was stolen.

Traffic Networks Company Patches Sensor Vulnerabilities

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 15:23
A company in charge of manufacturing sensors used in traffic control systems has patched a series of previously disclosed bugs that could’ve opened the products up to exploits.

New Timing Attack Could De-Anonymize Google Users

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 15:00
A new timing attack has been disclosed that could de-anonymize Google users under particular conditions. Google acknowledged the issue but said it would fix it because the risk is low.

Salesforce Warns Customers of Dyreza Banker Trojan Attacks

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 14:02
Salesforce.com is warning its customers that the Dyreza banker Trojan is now believed to be targeting some of the company’s users. The Trojan, which has the ability to bypass SSL, typically goes after customers of major banks, but seems to be expanding its reach. Dyreza is relatively new among the banker Trojan crowd and it […]
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