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Apple Fixes Cookie Access Vulnerability in Safari on Billions of Devices

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 15:02
Apple recently fixed a cookie vulnerability that existed in all versions of Safari - iOS, OS X, and Windows - that may have affected 1 billion devices.

Microsoft Patches Critical HTTP.sys Vulnerability

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 14:49
Microsoft and Adobe released security bulletins addressing critical vulnerabilities in their respective products.

Dell Threat Report Claims 100 Percent Increase in SCADA Attacks

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 14:46
Dell released its annual threat report yesterday, ringing the alarm bells on point-of-sale and industrial control system attack in 2014 and beyond.

Google Fixes Dozens of Bugs in Chrome 42

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 14:44
Google has released Chrome 42, a major security upgrade to the browser that includes patches for 45 vulnerabilities. The latest version of Chrome carries with it fixes for a number of high-severity bugs, including a cross-origin bypass in the HTML parser. That vulnerability earned an anonymous security researcher a reward of $7,500 from Google. In all, […]

Microsoft Security Updates April 2015

Secure List feed for B2B - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 13:58

Microsoft releases 11 Security Bulletins (MS15-032 through MS15-042) today, addressing a list of over 25 CVE-identified vulnerabilities for April of 2015. Critical vulnerabilities are fixed in Internet Explorer, Microsoft Office, and the network and graphics stacks. Most of the critical remote code execution (RCE) vulnerabilities reside in the IE memory corruption bugs for all versions of Internet Explorer (6-11) and the Microsoft Office use-after-free. updated: However, they appear to *almost* all be the result of private discoveries, at least, 24 of the 25. In reference to Office vulnerability CVE-2015-1641, “Microsoft is aware of limited attacks that attempt to exploit this vulnerability”.

The Microsoft Office CVE-2015-1649 use-after free is a critical RCE impacting a variety of software and scenarios. The vulnerable code exists across desktop versions Word 2007, 2010, the Word Viewer and Office Compatibility apps, but not Word 2013 or Word for Mac. It’s also critical RCE on the server-side in Word Automation Services on Sharepoint 2010 and Microsoft Office Web Apps Server 2010, but not SharePoint 2013 or Web Apps 2013.

As the new Verizon Data Breach 2015 report highlighted today, many exploits currently effective against targets are exploiting vulnerabilities patched long ago. According to their figures, many of the exploited CVE used on compromised hosts were published over a year prior. Microsoft provides Windows Update to easily keep your software updated, and Kaspersky products provide vulnerability scanners to help keep all of your software up-to-date, including Microsoft’s. Please patch asap.

From the heap of vulnerabilities and fixes rated “Important”, the Hyper-V DoS issue effects the newest Microsoft platform code: Windows 8.1 64-bit and Windows Server 2012 R2 (including the Server Core installation, which is fairly unusual). While the flawed code has not been found to enable EoP on other VMs within the Hyper-V host, attacked Hyper-V systems may lose management of all VMs in the Virtual Machine Manager.

Verizon DBIR Challenges Data Breach Cost Estimates

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 13:34
Data breaches are expensive to victim organizations, but that cost is going down, according to Verizon, which today released its annual Data Breach Investigations Report.

DigiCert Offers Continuous Monitoring of Digital Certificates to Defeat Fraud

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 12:26
It’s an interesting time for certificate authorities. On the one hand, interest has never been higher in Web encryption, privacy and transport security, thanks to Edward Snowden. But on the other hand, the last few years has seen a steady stream of compromises of CAs, mis-issued certificates and other problems. CAs hold the security and […]

US-CERT Warns of Issues With DNS Zone Transfer Requests

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 10:48
The US-CERT is warning administrators and network operators that a misconfiguration issue with some DNS servers that has been known about for more than 15 years and can give attackers detailed information about DNS zones is coming back around thanks to new scans that show a high number of servers vulnerable to the issue. The problem […]

Zero-Day Market Economics Favor Incentives for Defensive Tools

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 09:00
Research on the economics of the zero-day market conducted by HackerOne, MIT, Harvard and Facebook will be presented at RSA Conference.

Your Tax Refund with a Data Kidnapping Twist!

Secure List feed for B2B - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 07:40

Oh, how procrastination gets all of us! April 15th is the U.S. tax deadline and it looks like most of us will be coming down to the wire on declaring our taxes and holding our collective breath in expectation of that sweet, sweet refund. Sadly, our malware writing friends are aware of this and their discipline has proven far superior. Knowing that many are on the lookout for emails from the Internal Revenue Service concerning pending refunds, criminals have crafted some of their own:

The attachment is actually a Trojan-Downloader.MsWord.Agent malware, built by the same group behind the recent LogMeIn malicious campaign described here.

The infection scheme is very similar to the aforementioned, however, the threat actor has moved on from abusing Pastebin entries and has instead hacked a Web server in China to host the instructions script file. This file as well as the download URL are also encoded in Base64 and the resulting payload is actually ransomware.

URLs embedded in the malicious macros leading to a Base64 encoded instructions script file and the payload URL below

Instructions files with the URL to the ransomware payload

The malicious ransomware payload is detected by Kaspersky Anti-Virus as Trojan-Ransom.Win32.Foreign.mfbg

Due to the reliance on the IRS branding, this particular malicious campaign is mostly focused on US citizens and permanent residents of the USA.

As Ransomware Attacks Evolve, More Potential Victims Are at Risk

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 06:00
In early December, as most people were dealing with the stress of looking for the perfect holiday gifts and planning out their upcoming celebrations, police officers in a small New England town were under a different sort of pressure. The vital files and data the Tewksbury Police Department needed to go about its daily business had been encrypted […]

Vulnerabilities Identified in NY Banking Vendors

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 14:56
To bolster security, banks in New York are planning to enact new regulations for any third party vendors they do business with.

New SMB Flaw Affects All Versions of Windows

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 10:49
There is a serious vulnerability in all supported versions of Windows that can allow an attacker who has control of some portion of a victim’s network traffic to steal users’ credentials for valuable services. The bug is related to the way that Windows and other software handles some HTTP requests, and researchers say it affects […]

Details Disclosed on Darwin Nuke Bug in OS X, iOS

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 10:03
Researchers at Kaspersky Lab disclosed some details on the so-called Darwin Nuke vulnerability in Apple OS X and iOS.

Challenging CoinVault – it's time to free those files

Secure List feed for B2B - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 07:23

Some months ago we wrote a blog post about CoinVault. In that post we explained how we tore the malware apart in order to get to its original code and not the obfuscated one.

So when were contacted recently by the National High Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU) of the Netherlands' police and the Netherlands' National Prosecutors Office, who had obtained a database from a CoinVault command & control server (containing IVs, Keys and private Bitcoin wallets), we were able to put our accumulated insight to good use and accelerate the creation of a decryption tool.

We also created a website and started a communications campaign to notify victims that it might be possible to get their data back without paying.

To build the decryption tool we needed to know the following:

  • Which encryption algorithm was being used?
  • Which block cipher mode was being used?
  • And, most importantly, what malware are dealing with?

There was obviously no time for "hardcore" reverse engineering, so the first thing we did was run the malware sample to see what it was doing. And indeed, just as we thought, it was another CoinVault sample. The next thing we did was open the executable in a decompiler, where we saw that the same obfuscation method was used as described in the post. So CoinVault it is. However, we still didn't know which encryption algorithm and block cipher mode it was using.

But luckily we have a sandbox! The nice thing about the sandbox is that it executes the malware, but also has the ability to trace virtually anything. We can dump files and registry changes but in this case the memory dumps were the most interesting. We knew from the previous CoinVault samples that the malware was using the RijndaelManaged class, so all we had to do was search in the memory dump for this string.

And here it is. We see that it still uses AES, although not the 128-bit block size anymore, but the 256-bit one. Also the block cipher mode has changed from CBC to CFB. This was all the information we needed to write our decryption tool.

To see if you can decrypt your files for free, please go to https://noransom.kaspersky.com

Coordinated Takedown Puts End to Simda Botnet

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 07:08
A coordinated operation between international police and private technology companies shuts down the Simda botnet.

Simda's Hide and Seek: Grown-up Games

Secure List feed for B2B - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 00:30

On 9 April, 2015 Kaspersky Lab was involved in the synchronized Simda botnet takedown operation coordinated by INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation. In this case the investigation was initially started by Microsoft and expanded to involve a larger circle of participants including TrendMicro, the Cyber Defense Institute, officers from the Dutch National High Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU), the FBI, the Police Grand-Ducale Section Nouvelles Technologies in Luxembourg, and the Russian Ministry of the Interior's Cybercrime Department "K" supported by the INTERPOL National Central Bureau in Moscow.

As a result of this takedown 14 C&C servers were seized in the Netherlands, USA, Luxembourg, Poland and Russia. Preliminary analysis of some of the sinkholed server logs revealed a list of 190 countries affected by the Simda botnet.

Simba character, courtesy of Walt Disney Productions, has nothing to do with Simda botnet

Simda is a mysterious botnet used for cybercriminal purposes, such as the dissemination of potentially unwanted and malicious software. This bot is mysterious because it rarely appears on our KSN radars despite compromising a large number of hosts every day. This is partly due to detection of emulation, security tools and virtual machines. It has a number of methods to detect research sandbox environments with a view to tricking researchers by consuming all CPU resources or notifying the botnet owner about the external IP address of the research network. Another reason is a server-side polymorphism and the limited lifetime of the bots.

Simda is distributed by a number of infected websites that redirect to exploit kits. The bot uses hardcoded IP addresses to notifying the master about various stages of execution process. It downloads and runs additional components from its own update servers and can modify the system hosts file. The latter is quite an interesting technique, even if it seems deceptively obvious at first glance.

Normally malware authors modify host files to tamper with search engine results or blacklist certain security software websites, but the Simda bot adds unexpected records for google-analytics.com and connect.facebook.net to point to malicious IPs.

KL detected the #Simda #bot as Backdoor.Win32.Simda, it affected hundreds thousands victims worldwide

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Why is that, one might ask? We don't know, but we believe that the answer is connected with Simda's core purpose – the distribution of other malware. This criminal business model opens up the possibility of exclusive malware distribution. This means that the distributors can guarantee that only the client's malware is installed on infected machines. And that becomes the case when Simda interprets a response from the C&C server - it can deactivate itself by preventing the bot to start after next reboot, instantly exiting. This deactivation coincides with the modification of the system hosts file. As a farewell touch, Simda replaces the original hosts file with a new one from its own body.

Now, curious mind may ask: how does it help them? Those domains are no longer used to generate search results, but machines infected by Simda in the past might occasionally continue to send out HTTP requests to malicious servers from time to time, even in when exclusive 3rd-party malware is supposed to have been installed.

We need to remember that these machines were initially infected by an exploit kit using a vulnerability in unpatched software. It's highly likely that 3rd-party malware will be removed over time, but a careless user may never get round to updating vulnerable software.

If all those hosts keep coming back to the malicious servers and asking for web resources such as javascript files, the criminals could use the same exploits to re-infect the machines and sell them all over again – perhaps even 'exclusively' to the original client. This confirms once again – even criminals can't trust criminals.

In this investigation Microsoft and various law enforcement bodies completed the sinkholing process and Kaspersky Lab willingly contributed to the preparations for the takedown. That work included technical analysis of malware, collecting infection statistics, advising on botnet takedown strategy and consulting our INTERPOL partners.

Kaspersky Lab detected the Simda bot as Backdoor.Win32.Simda and according to our estimations based on KSN statistics and telemetry from our partners it affected hundreds thousands victims worldwide.

Simda is automatically generated on demand and this is confirmed by the absence of any order in compilation link times. Below is a chart generated from a small subset of about 70 random Simda samples:

Samples link times in UTC timezone

The increase in link times is most likely related to the activity of the majority of Simda victims located somewhere between UTC-9 and UTC-5 timezones, which includes United States.

Thanks to the sinkhole operation and data sharing between partners we have put up a page where you can check if your IP has connected to Simda C&C servers in the past. If you suspect your computer was compromised you can use one of our free or trial solutions to scan your whole hard drive or install Kaspersky Internet Security for long-term protection.

Kaspersky Lab products currently detect hundreds of thousands of modifications of the Simda together with many different 3rd-party malware distributed during the Simda campaign.

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