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Experts Question Legality of Use of Regin Malware by Intel Agencies

Threatpost for B2B - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 10:51
Though security researchers involved in uncovering the attack have remained mum on the attribution of Regin, privacy experts say that if one of the intelligence agencies is involved, there's no legal basis for the operation.

Craigslist Back Online Following DNS Hijack

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 17:11
The popular classified website Craigslist is back online today following a DNS attack that forced it offline for several hours Sunday evening.

Remote Code Execution in Popular Hikvision Surveillance DVR

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 12:48
A number Hikvision digital video recorders contain vulnerabilities that an attacker could remotely exploit in order to gain full control of those devices.

Costin Raiu on the Regin APT Malware

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 11:05
Denis Fisher talks with Costin Raiu of the Kaspersky Lab GReAT Team about the discovery of the Regin APT malware, the threat's targets and tactics, its ability to compromise GSM base stations and its other capabilities.

Regin Cyberespionage Platform Also Spies on GSM Networks

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 10:09
Kaspersky Lab researchers have learned that the Regin cyberespionage platform also targets GSM telecommunications networks.

EFF, Privacy Groups Say NIST Crypto Standards Must be Free From Backdoors

Threatpost for B2B - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 09:24
The EFF and a long list of civil and privacy groups have sent a letter to NIST, emphasizing the need for the agency to create "a process for establishing secure and resilient encryption standards, free from back doors or other known vulnerabilities."

Regin: Nation-state ownage of GSM networks

Secure List feed for B2B - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 09:00
Motto: "Beware of Regin, the master! His heart is poisoned. He would be thy bane..." "The Story of Siegfried" by James Baldwin   Introduction, history

Download our full Regin paper (PDF).

In the spring of 2012, following a Kaspersky Lab presentation on the unusual facts surrounding the Duqu malware, a security researcher contacted us and mentioned that Duqu reminded him of another high-end malware incident. Although he couldn't share a sample, the third-party researcher mentioned the "Regin" name, a malware attack that is now dreaded by many security administrators in governmental agencies around the world.

For the past two years, we've been tracking this most elusive malware across the world. From time to time, samples would appear on various multi-scanner services, but they were all unrelated to each other, cryptic in functionality and lacking context.

It's unknown exactly when the first samples of Regin were created. Some of them have timestamps dating back to 2003.

The victims of Regin fall into the following categories:

  • Telecom operators
  • Government institutions
  • Multi-national political bodies
  • Financial institutions
  • Research institutions
  • Individuals involved in advanced mathematical/cryptographical research

So far, we've observed two main objectives from the attackers:

  • Intelligence gathering
  • Facilitating other types of attacks

While in most cases, the attackers were focused on extracting sensitive information, such as e-mails and documents, we have observed cases where the attackers compromised telecom operators to enable the launch of additional sophisticated attacks. More about this in the GSM Targeting section below.

Perhaps one of the most publicly known victims of Regin is Jean Jacques Quisquater (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Jacques_Quisquater), a well-known Belgian cryptographer. In February 2014, Quisquater announced he was the victim of a sophisticated cyber intrusion incident. We were able to obtain samples from the Quisquater case and confirm they belong to the Regin platform.

Another interesting victim of Regin is a computer we are calling "The Magnet of Threats". This computer belongs to a research institution and has been attacked by Turla, Mask/Careto, Regin, Itaduke, Animal Farm and some other advanced threats that do not have a public name, all co-existing happily on the same computer at some point.

Initial compromise and lateral movement

The exact method of the initial compromise remains a mystery, although several theories exist, which include man-in-the-middle attacks with browser zero-day exploits. For some of the victims, we observed tools and modules designed for lateral movement. So far, we have not encountered any exploits. The replication modules are copied to remote computers by using Windows administrative shares and then executed. Obviously, this technique requires administrative privileges inside the victim's network. In several cases, the infected machines were also Windows domain controllers. Targeting of system administrators via web-based exploits is one simple way of achieving immediate administrative access to the entire network.

The Regin platform

In short, Regin is a cyber-attack platform which the attackers deploy in the victim networks for ultimate remote control at all possible levels.

The platform is extremely modular in nature and has multiple stages.

Regin platform diagram

The first stage ("stage 1") is generally the only executable file that will appear in victim' systems. Further stages are stored either directly on the hard drive (for 64 bit systems), as NTFS Extended Attributes or registry entries. We've observed many different stage 1 modules, which sometimes have been merged with public sources to achieve a type of polymorphism, complicating the detection process.

The second stage has multiple purposes and can remove the Regin infection from the system if instructed so by the 3rd stage.

The second stage also creates a marker file that can be used to identify the infected machine. Known filenames for this marker are:

  • %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\nsreg1.dat
  • %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\bssec3.dat
  • %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\msrdc64.dat

Stage 3 exists only on 32 bit systems - on 64 bit systems, stage 2 loads the dispatcher directly, skipping the third stage.

Stage 4, the dispatcher, is perhaps the most complex single module of the entire platform. The dispatcher is the user-mode core of the framework. It is loaded directly as the third stage of the 64-bit bootstrap process or extracted and loaded from the VFS as module 50221 as the fourth stage on 32-bit systems.

The dispatcher takes care of the most complicated tasks of the Regin platform, such as providing an API to access virtual file systems, basic communications and storage functions as well as network transport sub-routines. In essence, the dispatcher is the brain that runs the entire platform.

A thorough description of all malware stages can be found in our full technical paper.

Virtual File Systems (32/64-bit)

The most interesting code from the Regin platform is stored in encrypted file storages, known as Virtual File Systems (VFSes).

During our analysis we were able to obtain 24 VFSes, from multiple victims around the world. Generally, these have random names and can be located in several places in the infected system. For a full list, including format of the Regin VFSes, see our technical paper.

Unusual modules and artifacts

With high-end APT groups such as the one behind Regin, mistakes are very rare. Nevertheless, they do happen. Some of the VFSes we analyzed contain words which appear to be the respective codenames of the modules deployed on the victim:

  • legspinv2.6 and LEGSPINv2.6
  • WILLISCHECKv2.0
  • HOPSCOTCH

Another module we found, which is a plugin type 55001.0 references another codename, which is U_STARBUCKS:

GSM Targeting

The most interesting aspect we found so far about Regin is related to an infection of a large GSM operator. One VFS encrypted entry we located had internal id 50049.2 and appears to be an activity log on a GSM Base Station Controller.

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Base_station_subsystem

According to the GSM documentation (http://www.telecomabc.com/b/bsc.html): "The Base Station Controller (BSC) is in control of and supervises a number of Base Transceiver Stations (BTS). The BSC is responsible for the allocation of radio resources to a mobile call and for the handovers that are made between base stations under his control. Other handovers are under control of the MSC."

Here's a look at the decoded Regin GSM activity log:

This log is about 70KB in size and contains hundreds of entries like the ones above. It also includes timestamps which indicate exactly when the command was executed.

The entries in the log appear to contain Ericsson OSS MML (Man-Machine Language as defined by ITU-T) commands.

Here's a list of some commands issued on the Base Station Controller, together with some of their timestamps:

2008-04-25 11:12:14: rxmop:moty=rxotrx; 2008-04-25 11:58:16: rxmsp:moty=rxotrx; 2008-04-25 14:37:05: rlcrp:cell=all; 2008-04-26 04:48:54: rxble:mo=rxocf-170,subord; 2008-04-26 06:16:22: rxtcp:MOty=RXOtg,cell=kst022a; 2008-04-26 10:06:03: IOSTP; 2008-04-27 03:31:57: rlstc:cell=pty013c,state=active; 2008-04-27 06:07:43: allip:acl=a2; 2008-04-28 06:27:55: dtstp:DIP=264rbl2; 2008-05-02 01:46:02: rlstp:cell=all,state=halted; 2008-05-08 06:12:48: rlmfc:cell=NGR035W,mbcchno=83&512&93&90&514&522,listtype=active; 2008-05-08 07:33:12: rlnri:cell=NGR058y,cellr=ngr058x; 2008-05-12 17:28:29: rrtpp:trapool=all;


Descriptions for the commands:

  • rxmop - check software version type;
  • rxmsp - list current call forwarding settings of the Mobile Station;
  • rlcrp - list off call forwarding settings for the Base Station Controller;
  • rxble - enable (unblock) call forwarding;
  • rxtcp - show the Transceiver Group of particular cell;
  • allip - show external alarm;
  • dtstp - show DIgital Path (DIP) settings (DIP is the name of the function used for supervision of the connected PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) lines);
  • rlstc - activate cell(s) in the GSM network;
  • rlstp - stop cell(s) in the GSM network;
  • rlmfc - add frequencies to the active broadcast control channel allocation list;
  • rlnri - add cell neightbour;
  • rrtpp - show radio transmission transcoder pool details;

The log seems to contain not only the executed commands but also usernames and passwords of some engineering accounts:

sed[snip]:Alla[snip]
hed[snip]:Bag[snip]
oss:New[snip]
administrator:Adm[snip]
nss1:Eric[snip]

In total, the log indicates that commands were executed on 136 different cells. Some of the cell names include "prn021a, gzn010a, wdk004, kbl027a, etc...". The command log we obtained covers a period of about one month, from April 25, 2008 through May 27, 2008. It is unknown why the commands stopped in May 2008 though; perhaps the infection was removed or the attackers achieved their objective and moved on. Another explanation is that the attackers improved or changed the malware to stop saving logs locally and that's why only some older logs were discovered.

Communication and C&C

The C&C mechanism implemented in Regin is extremely sophisticated and relies on communication drones deployed by the attackers throughout the victim networks. Most victims communicate with another machine in their own internal network, through various protocols, as specified in the config file. These include HTTP and Windows network pipes. The purpose of such a complex infrastructure is to achieve two goals: give attackers access deep into the network, potentially bypassing air gaps and restrict as much as possible the traffic to the C&C.

Here's a look at the decoded configurations:

17.3.40.101 transport 50037 0 0 y.y.y.5:80 ; transport 50051 217.y.y.yt:443 17.3.40.93 transport 50035 217.x.x.x:443 ; transport 50035 217.x.x.x:443 50.103.14.80 transport 27 203.199.89.80 ; transport 50035 194.z.z.z:8080 51.9.1.3 transport 50035 192.168.3.3:445 ; transport 50035 192.168.3.3:9322 18.159.0.1 transport 50271 DC ; transport 50271 DC


In the above table, we see configurations extracted from several victims that bridge together infected machines in what appears to be virtual networks: 17.3.40.x, 50.103.14.x, 51.9.1.x, 18.159.0.x. One of these routes reaches out to the "external" C&C server at 203.199.89.80.

The numbers right after the "transport" indicate the plugin that handles the communication. These are in our case:

  • 27 - ICMP network listener using raw sockets
  • 50035 - Winsock-based network transport
  • 50037 - Network transport over HTTP
  • 50051 - Network transport over HTTPS
  • 50271 - Network transport over SMB (named pipes)

The machines located on the border of the network act as routers, effectively connecting victims from inside the network with C&Cs on the internet.

After decoding all the configurations we've collected, we were able to identify the following external C&Cs.

C&C server IP Location Description 61.67.114.73 Taiwan, Province Of China Taichung Chwbn 202.71.144.113 India, Chetput Chennai Network Operations  (team-m.co) 203.199.89.80 India, Thane Internet Service Provider 194.183.237.145 Belgium, Brussels Perceval S.a.

One particular case includes a country in the Middle East. This case was mind-blowing so we thought it's important to present it. In this specific country, all the victims we identified communicate with each other, forming a peer-to-peer network. The P2P network includes the president's office, a research center, educational institution network and a bank.

These victims spread across the country are all interconnected to each other. One of the victims contains a translation drone which has the ability to forward the packets outside of the country, to the C&C in India.

This represents a rather interesting command-and-control mechanism, which is guaranteed to raise very little suspicions. For instance, if all commands to the president's office are sent through the bank's network, then all the malicious traffic visible for the president's office sysadmins will be only with the bank, in the same country.

Victim Statistics

Over the past two years, we collected statistics about the attacks and victims of Regin. These were aided by the fact that even after the malware is uninstalled, certain artifacts are left behind which can help identify an infected (but cleaned) system. For instance, we've seen several cases where the systems were cleaned but the "msrdc64.dat" infection marker was left behind.

So far, victims of Regin were identified in 14 countries:

  • Algeria
  • Afghanistan
  • Belgium
  • Brazil
  • Fiji
  • Germany
  • Iran
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Kiribati
  • Malaysia
  • Pakistan
  • Russia
  • Syria

In total, we counted 27 different victims, although it should be pointed out that the definition of a victim here refers to a full entity, including their entire network. The number of unique PCs infected with Regin is of course much, much higher.

From the map above, Fiji and Kiribati are unusual, because we rarely see such advanced malware in such remote, small countries. In particular, the victim in Kiribati is most unusual. To put this into context, Kiribati is a small island in the Pacific, with a population around 100,000.

More information about the Regin victims is available through Kaspersky Intelligent Services. Contact: intelreports@kaspersky.com

Attribution

Considering the complexity and cost of Regin development, it is likely that this operation is supported by a nation-state. While attribution remains a very difficult problem when it comes to professional attackers such as those behind Regin, certain metadata extracted from the samples might still be relevant.

As this information could be easily altered by the developers, it's up to the reader to attempt to interpret this: as an intentional false flag or a non-critical indicator left by the developers.

More information about Regin is available to Kaspersky Intelligent Services' clients. Contact: intelreports@kaspersky.com

Conclusions

For more than a decade, a sophisticated group known as Regin has targeted high-profile entities around the world with an advanced malware platform. As far as we can tell, the operation is still active, although the malware may have been upgraded to more sophisticated versions. The most recent sample we've seen was from a 64-bit infection. This infection was still active in the spring of 2014.

The name Regin is apparently a reversed "In Reg", short for "In Registry", as the malware can store its modules in the registry. This name and detections first appeared in anti-malware products around March 2011.

From some points of view, the platform reminds us of another sophisticated malware: Turla. Some similarities include the use of virtual file systems and the deployment of communication drones to bridge networks together. Yet through their implementation, coding methods, plugins, hiding techniques and flexibility, Regin surpasses Turla as one of the most sophisticated attack platforms we have ever analysed.

The ability of this group to penetrate and monitor GSM networks is perhaps the most unusual and interesting aspect of these operations. In today's world, we have become too dependent on mobile phone networks which rely on ancient communication protocols with little or no security available for the end user. Although all GSM networks have mechanisms embedded which allow entities such as law enforcement to track suspects, there are other parties which can gain this ability and further abuse them to launch other types of attacks against mobile users.

Full technical paper with IOCs.

Kaspersky products detect modules from the Regin platform as: Trojan.Win32.Regin.gen and Rootkit.Win32.Regin.

If you detect a Regin infection in your network, contact us at: intelservices@kaspersky.com

A Nightmare on Malware Street

Secure List feed for B2B - Sat, 11/22/2014 - 11:49

Another ransomware has been spotted in the wild lately, branded as 'CoinVault'. This one involves some interesting details worth mentioning, including the peculiar characteristic of offering the free decryption of one of the hostage files as a sign of good faith.

Technically, the malware writers have taken a lot of measures to slow down the analysis of the sample. Even though it was made with Microsoft's .NET framework, it takes a while to reach the core of their malicious application. Upon opening the initial sample in 'IL Spy', we find that the program starts by using a string key which is passed to a decryption method, which will ultimately get the executable code.

A byte array is also passed as a parameter to the 'EncryptOrDecrypt' method, which in conjunction with the key will output a final byte array with the malware's much needed code.

Implementing these functions in Visual Studio is as easy as copy/paste, so we execute the methods gotten from the source code and set a breakpoint to check what the decryption method is doing. A '77', '90' in decimal tells us we are on the right track since when converting these numbers to hexadecimal we get '4D', '5A', which is the magic number for DOS executable files identified by the ASCII string 'MZ'. We dump all the bytes to an executable file in disk for further analysis.

We get a file called 'SHIELD runner', serving as a 'RunPE' helper application. A 'RunPE' application serves to execute files on the fly, meaning that a memory stream is created from an input and executed directly without first storing the file to disk. This is useful for malware writers that want to avoid leaving traces behind, and as we'll soon see, it's not all this file has to offer.

Although we'll carry on with our investigation into the ransomware code, there's a noteworthy string embedded in the SHIELD runner executable, 'd:\Users\dennis…'.

In the same way as before, a string key and a byte array are used to generate yet another executable file. As you can see, the cybercriminals have gone to great lengths in order to slow down the analysis and hide the malicious payload for as long as possible.

Not only do we have the usual 'RunPE' functions but also a nice additional set of methods that will help the malware detect analysis tools and virtualized environments. It checks for 'Sandboxie', 'Wireshark', 'Winsock Packet Editor' and even checks whether the machine's name is 'MALTEST'. Fortunately, none of these conditions are met in my environment so we are good to go.

But wait…. there's more! The detection of the virtualized environment will cause the execution to stop and the malicious payload to be hidden.

Using PowerShell, we are going to check if the malware can actually detect our environment. Apparently it can, so we'll need to carry out some simple modifications in order to continue the analysis process.

We can fix this easily from VMWare's configuration VMX file, setting the option 'SMBIOS.reflectHost = TRUE'. Running out PowerShell checks again, we witness the good news and are ready to go even further.

Repeating the process of string key and byte array decryption and dumping the memory at just the right time pays off and we finally end up with the set of files that will be used during the infection.

The CoinVault 'Locker' has two main Windows forms: the main one telling us to pay in order to recover the victim's files and 'frmGetFreeDecrypt' which is used to decrypt one of the victim's files as a way to demonstrate that we can in fact recover our precious information if we comply in a timely manner.

However, before the 'Locker' analysis we'll need to deobfuscate it (at least a little bit). The malware writers display some sense of humor here: if the analyst has gone through this much trouble to reach this point it seems he's welcome as suggested by the phrase, 'Your worst nightmare'. Moreover, they are keen enough to leave a banner signaling the obfuscation utility they used. In this case we are dealing with the ever popular 'Confuser', in its version 1.9.0.0.

Certainly, this is confusing… but we can make it better. So, we go from something that resembles a Chinese manuscript to readable source code.

We now can see, amongst the many (many) methods and delegates inside the assembly some relevant code regarding the file encryption. .NET's 'System.Security.Cryptography.RijndaelManaged' namespace is used (amongst others) revealing symmetric encryption functionality.

We can even get a glance at how the PRNG was implemented and some internal details of the malicious application.

When we are finally shown the 'Locker' executable, a connection is made to a dynamic domain. During the analysis, two addresses were present: 'cvredirect.no-ip.net' and 'cvredirect.ddns.net'. They are currently offline and this hampers the 'Locker' functionality, since upon traffic analysis inspection we were able to see that a hardware ID is sent to the C&C in order to use a dynamic file encryption password. I guess now we can understand why the malware is checking for Wireshark in the system. After all, cybercriminals wouldn't want you to take a peek at how their business is getting done.

At this point, if everything went well (for the cybercriminals) your personal documents and files have been encrypted and a payment is demanded in less than 24 hours or the price will rise. The bitcoin address used is dynamic too, making the tracing of the funds a lot more complex than usual.

Is this your worst nightmare? If you don't have an updated anti-malware suite and (just in case) a backup of your most important files, it might just be.

Kaspersky detects this family as 'Trojan-Ransom.Win32.Crypmodadv.cj'. We have already seen similar malicious applications in the past (regarding functionality) such as 'TorrentLocker', and some PowerShell ransomware, but the amount of effort invested in this one in order to protect the code shows that cybercriminals are leveraging already developed libraries and functionality in order to avoid reinventing the wheel.

FTC Shutters $120 Million Tech Support, Bogus Software Scam

Threatpost for B2B - Fri, 11/21/2014 - 16:09
The FTC and a Florida federal court issued temporary restraining orders against a number of organizations and individuals involved in a massive telemarketing operating selling bogus software and support.

Threatpost News Wrap, November 21, 2014

Threatpost for B2B - Fri, 11/21/2014 - 13:20
In this week's news wrap podcast, Threatpost editors discuss an out-of-band Microsoft patch, the compromised Joomla and WordPress plug-inattack campaign and the Detekt anti-surveillance tool.​

Buffer Overflow Haunts Advantech WebAccess SCADA Product

Threatpost for B2B - Fri, 11/21/2014 - 11:00
The ICS-CERT is warning users about a stack buffer overflow in the Advantech WebAccess SCADA product that could lead to arbitrary code execution. Advantech WebAccess is a SCADA and human-machine interface product that’s accessible over the Web. It’s used in a variety of industries, including energy, manufacturing, government and the commercial sector. The vulnerability affects […]

WordPress 4.0.1 Update Patches Critical XSS Vulnerability

Threatpost for B2B - Fri, 11/21/2014 - 09:52
The latest version of WordPress, 4.0.1, patches a critical cross-site scripting vulnerability in comment fields that enables admin-level control over a website.
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